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Internalization And Market Quality: An Empirical Investigation

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  • Norris L. Larrymore
  • Albert J. Murphy

Abstract

Abstract We explore the relation between market quality and internalization through a pre- and postenactment analysis of the implementation of the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSE) Price Improvement Rule on October 26, 1998. We find that the rule revision is accompanied by falls in the bid-ask spread and the variance of the pricing error and by rising internalization rates. This study informs proponents of market concentration, brokers, dealers, exchange administrators, and market regulators that a judicious regime of regulated internalization may be associated with superior market effectiveness. Copyright (c) 2009 The Southern Finance Association and the Southwestern Finance Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Norris L. Larrymore & Albert J. Murphy, 2009. "Internalization And Market Quality: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 32(3), pages 337-363.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jfnres:v:32:y:2009:i:3:p:337-363
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Upson, James & Van Ness, Robert A., 2017. "Multiple markets, algorithmic trading, and market liquidity," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 49-68.

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