IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/growch/v34y2003i3p276-298.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Onset of Health Problems and the Propensity of Workers to Change Employers and Occupations

Author

Listed:
  • Jodi Messer Pelkowski
  • Mark C. Berger

Abstract

Although many studies have investigated how poor health affects hours of work and labor force participation, few have examined the extent to which individuals adapt in order to remain in the labor market. Individuals experiencing health problems may move to different types of work in order to remain in the labor force or to reduce the negative labor market consequences of illness. This paper investigates the movement between employers, and among occupation categories when changing employers, using data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). One advantage of the HRS is that its questions on life‐cycle employment and health patterns permit a long‐term perspective on job mobility that is unavailable in most other datasets. Workers with health problems are more likely than healthy workers to remain with their current employer than to switch employers. But among those who switch employers, those with health problems are more likely to change broad occupational categories than are healthy workers. While many individuals remain with the same employer after the onset of health problems, many do switch employers and occupations, even in the presence of ADA legislation.

Suggested Citation

  • Jodi Messer Pelkowski & Mark C. Berger, 2003. "The Onset of Health Problems and the Propensity of Workers to Change Employers and Occupations," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(3), pages 276-298, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:34:y:2003:i:3:p:276-298
    DOI: 10.1111/1468-2257.00219
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-2257.00219
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daron Acemoglu & Joshua D. Angrist, 2001. "Consequences of Employment Protection? The Case of the Americans with Disabilities Act," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(5), pages 915-957, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kostas Mavromaras & Joanne Flavel, 2017. "An Analysis of the Impact of Health on Occupation," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 93, pages 86-104, June.
    2. Parsons, Janet A. & Eakin, Joan M. & Bell, Robert S. & Franche, Renée-Louise & Davis, Aileen M., 2008. ""So, are you back to work yet?" Re-conceptualizing 'work' and 'return to work' in the context of primary bone cancer," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(11), pages 1826-1836, December.
    3. Tingting Chen & John D. Radke & Wei Lang & Xun Li, 2020. "Environment resilience and public health: Assessing healthcare's vulnerability to climate change in the San Francisco Bay Area," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 607-625, June.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Thomas K. Bauer & Stefan Bender & Holger Bonin, 2007. "Dismissal Protection and Worker Flows in Small Establishments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(296), pages 804-821, November.
    2. Bell, David & Heitmueller, Axel, 2009. "The Disability Discrimination Act in the UK: Helping or hindering employment among the disabled?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 465-480, March.
    3. Katie M. Jajtner & Sophie Mitra & Christine Fountain & Austin Nichols, 0. "Rising Income Inequality Through a Disability Lens: Trends in the United States 1981–2018," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-34.
    4. Anne Knott, 2005. "Induced Discrimination and Firm Size: Information vs Incentive Effects," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 25(4), pages 393-405, November.
    5. Behaghel, Luc & Crépon, Bruno & Sédillot, Béatrice, 2008. "The perverse effects of partial employment protection reform: The case of French older workers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(3-4), pages 696-721, April.
    6. D'Amuri, Francesco & Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Peri, Giovanni, 2010. "The labor market impact of immigration in Western Germany in the 1990s," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 550-570, May.
    7. Nicolas Lepage-Saucier & Etienne Wasmer, 2016. "Does Employment Protection Raise Stress? A Cross-Country and Cross-Province Analysis," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(1), pages 33-66.
    8. David H. Autor & John J. Donohue & Stewart J. Schwab, 2006. "The Costs of Wrongful-Discharge Laws," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(2), pages 211-231, May.
    9. David H. Autor, 2015. "The unsustainable rise of the disability rolls in the United States: causes, consequences and policy options," Chapters, in: John Karl Scholz & Hyungypo Moon & Sang-Hyup Lee (ed.),Social Policies in an Age of Austerity, chapter 5, pages 107-136, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Jonathan Guryan, 2004. "Desegregation and Black Dropout Rates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 919-943, September.
    11. Allison Milner & Yamna Taouk & George Disney & Zoe Aitken & Jerome Rachele & Anne Kavanagh, 2018. "Employment predictors of exit from work among workers with disabilities: A survival analysis from the household income labour dynamics in Australia survey," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(12), pages 1-14, December.
    12. Adriana Kugler & Juan F. Jimeno & Virginia Hernanz, "undated". "Employment Consequences of Restrictive Permanent Contracts: Evidence from Spanish Labor Market Reforms," Working Papers 2003-14, FEDEA.
    13. Eirini-Christina Saloniki, 2014. "Investigating Exploitation and Productivity in Explaining the Disability Wage Penalty," Studies in Economics 1402, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    14. David H. Autor, 2000. "Outsourcing at Will: Unjust Dismissal Doctrine and the Growth of Temporary Help Employment," NBER Working Papers 7557, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. O’Higgins Niall & Pica Giovanni, 2020. "Complementarities between Labour Market Institutions and their Causal Impact on Youth Labour Market Outcomes," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(3), pages 1-37, July.
    16. Amine Samir, 2015. "Reflections On Employment Protection Legislation: An International Comparison," Comparative Economic Research, Sciendo, vol. 18(1), pages 119-130, March.
    17. Adriana D. Kugler, 2001. "From severance pay to self-insurance: Effects of severance payments savings accounts in Colombia," Economics Working Papers 592, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    18. Purvi Sevak & John O'Neill & Andrew Houtenville & Debra L. Brucker, 2016. "State and Local Determinants of Employment Outcomes among Individuals with Disabilities," Working Papers 16-21, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    19. Mazzonna, Fabrizio, 2014. "The long lasting effects of education on old age health: Evidence of gender differences," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 129-138.
    20. Nick Drydakis, 2015. "The effect of sexual activity on wages," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(2), pages 192-215, May.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:34:y:2003:i:3:p:276-298. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0017-4815 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.