IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ecorec/v86y2010is1p61-68.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

When Expansionary Fiscal Policy is Contractionary: A Neoklassikal Scenario

Author

Listed:
  • WILLIAM COLEMAN

Abstract

The paper presents a simple theoretical account of how an increase in government purchases may reduce total employment. It is shown that in a 'neoklassikal' model - in which utility maximising consumption choices are combined with a fixed-coefficient technology - an increase in government purchases will reduce the demand for labour at the given wage rate. The reasoning turns on the link between optimising consumption behaviour and employment in the investment sector. An increase in G will (as a matter of arithmetic) make current consumption scarcer relative to future consumption; and thereby reduce the valuation of future consumption in terms of current consumption. As labour is valued according to its contribution to future consumption (through its contribution to capital formation), it follows that an increase in G will reduce the wage at any given volume of employment. Copyright © 2010 The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • William Coleman, 2010. "When Expansionary Fiscal Policy is Contractionary: A Neoklassikal Scenario," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(s1), pages 61-68, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:86:y:2010:i:s1:p:61-68
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showTOC&journalCode=ecor&volume=86&issue=s1&year=2010&part=null
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ross Guest & Anthony J Makin, 2012. "Fiscal stimulus: an overlapping generations analysis," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 17(2), pages 1-25, September.
    2. Ross Guest & Anthony J. Makin, 2011. "In the Long Run, the Multiplier is Dead: Lessons from a Simulation," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 18(1), pages 13-22.
    3. Anthony J. Makin, 2015. "Expansionary Versus Contractionary Government Spending," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(1), pages 56-65, January.
    4. Ross Guest & Anthony Makin, 2013. "Special Issue. Guest Editor: Zhihao Yu," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(3), pages 609-626, August.
    5. Ross Guest & Anthony J. Makin, 2011. "The Dynamic Effects of Fiscal Stimulus in a Two Sector Open Economy," DEGIT Conference Papers c016_045, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:86:y:2010:i:s1:p:61-68. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/esausea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.