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Patent Breadth In An International Setting

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  • Eric W. Bond
  • Ben Zissimos

Abstract

We examine the Nash equilibria of a game where two national governments set patent breadth strategically. Broader patents make R&D more attractive, but the effect on static efficiency is nonmonotonic. In a North.South model, where only the North can innovate, harmonization of patent breadth lowers welfare relative to the Nash equilibrium. When both countries can innovate, harmonization toward narrower patent breadth may raise world welfare.
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Suggested Citation

  • Eric W. Bond & Ben Zissimos, 2017. "Patent Breadth In An International Setting," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(3), pages 1538-1555, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:1538-1555
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ecin.12440
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yuki Saito, 2018. "On the trade, growth, and welfare effects of intellectual property rights protection," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 85(1), pages 235-254, July.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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