IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/coecpo/v14y1996i3p14-25.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Corruption And Schumpeterian Growth In Different Economic Environments

Author

Listed:
  • SERGUEY BRAGUINSKY

Abstract

This paper takes up the phenomenon of corruption and its relationship to growth explicitly in conjunction with overall institutional environment in which it occurs. The literature has pointed out that some forms of corruption are more detrimental to growth, while others can be considered even beneficial, given the underlying regulation. These notions are made more precise in a framework of Schumpeterian growth in "capitalist" and "totalitarian" environments. The analysis shows that corruption in an overall competitive capitalist environment ordinarily is of a transitive nature and is likely to be conducive to economic growth rather than otherwise. On the other hand, in totalitarian environment, corruption, though also possibly conducive to static welfare, becomes deeply entrenched in the socio-economic system and inevitably leads to a breakdown of the system. That breakdown, in turn, greatly enhances the possibilities for corruption and makes it especially detrimental to the prospects for resumed economic growth. Copyright 1996 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Serguey Braguinsky, 1996. "Corruption And Schumpeterian Growth In Different Economic Environments," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 14(3), pages 14-25, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:14:y:1996:i:3:p:14-25
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1465-7287.1996.tb00620.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Murphy, Kevin M & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1993. "Why Is Rent-Seeking So Costly to Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 409-414, May.
    2. Grossman, Sanford J & Hart, Oliver D, 1986. "The Costs and Benefits of Ownership: A Theory of Vertical and Lateral Integration," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(4), pages 691-719, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Stephen S. Everhart & Mariusz A. Sumlinski, 2001. "Trends in Private Investment in Developing Countries : Statistics for 1970-2000 and the Impact on Private Investment of Corruption and the Quality of Public Investment," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13989, July.
    2. Habib, M. & Zurawicki, L., 2001. "Country-level investments and the effect of corruption -- some empirical evidence," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 10(6), pages 687-700, December.
    3. Serguey Braguinsky, 1998. "Democracy And Economic Reform: Theory And Some Evidence From The Russian Case," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(2), pages 227-240, April.
    4. Wolfgang Maennig, 2004. "Korruption im internationalen Sport: ökonomische Analyse und Lösungsansätze," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 73(2), pages 263-291.
    5. Rahim M. Quazi, 2014. "Corruption and Foreign Direct Investment in East Asia and South Asia: An Econometric Study," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 4(2), pages 231-242.
    6. Ingrid Ott, 2004. "Bureaucratic corruption and macroeconomic performance," Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 303, Society for Computational Economics.
    7. Roth, Timothy P., 1997. "Competence-difficulty gaps, ethics and the new social welfare theory," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 533-552.
    8. Roth, Timothy P., 1999. "Consequentialism, rights, and the new social welfare theory," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 95-109.
    9. Peyton, Kyle & Belasen, Ariel, 2010. "The case for human development: a cross-country analysis of corruption perceptions," MPRA Paper 31385, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Anna Alon & Amy Hageman, 2013. "The Impact of Corruption on Firm Tax Compliance in Transition Economies: Whom Do You Trust?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 116(3), pages 479-494, September.
    11. Hella Engerer, 1998. "Ursachen, Folgen und Bekämpfung von Korruption: liefern ökonomische Ansätze bestechende Argumente?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 161, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:14:y:1996:i:3:p:14-25. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/weaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.