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What Determines Vacation Leave? The Role Of Gender

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  • Ali Fakih

Abstract

Vacation leave is introduced in workplaces to improve the working environment. Surprisingly, it has been observed that a large number of workers do not use all of their entitled vacation days. This paper provides a novel set of facts about the gender differences in taking vacation time using the Canadian Workplace Employee Survey, which is a linked longitudinal employer†employee dataset. The results show considerable differences between men and women in the estimated effects of some demographic characteristics after controlling for job and workplace characteristics. However, they reveal significant implications of work arrangements (e.g., part†time work, flexible work schedules, and home†based work), job promotion, supervisory tasks, and union membership for vacation use, for both men and women. This paper provides further insights on the use of fringe benefits that may be useful to policymakers and businesses.

Suggested Citation

  • Ali Fakih, 2018. "What Determines Vacation Leave? The Role Of Gender," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(1), pages 1-19, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:70:y:2018:i:1:p:1-19
    DOI: 10.1111/boer.12114
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/boer.12114
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ali Fakih, 2014. "Vacation Leave, Work Hours, and Wages: New Evidence from Linked Employer–Employee Data," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(4), pages 376-398, December.
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    6. Joseph Altonji & Jennifer Oldham, 2003. "Vacation laws and annual work hours," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, vol. 27(Q III), pages 19-29.
    7. Andrea Ichino & Enrico Moretti, 2009. "Biological Gender Differences, Absenteeism, and the Earnings Gap," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 183-218, January.
    8. Huffman, Wallace, 2006. "Understanding Post-War Changes in U.S. Household Production: A Full-Income Demand-System Perspective," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12696, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    9. Tatkei Lai & Travis Ng, 2014. "The impact of product market competition on training provision: Evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 47(3), pages 856-888, August.
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    11. Jessica Bloom & Sabine Geurts & Michiel Kompier, 2013. "Vacation (after-) effects on employee health and well-being, and the role of vacation activities, experiences and sleep," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 613-633, April.
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