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The Citizen‐Consumer as Industrial Relations Actor: New Ways of Working and the End‐user in Social Care

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  • Ian Kessler
  • Stephen Bach

Abstract

This article explores the role of the citizen-consumer as an actor in public service industrial relations. Based on research into the New Types of Worker programme in social care, the article considers how new work roles engage end‐users as citizen‐consumers in work relations and their consequences for stakeholders. It highlights the forms assumed by these roles and the factors influencing their development and impact, concluding that if the citizen‐consumer is to be treated as an actor in industrial relations, researchers must show greater sensitivity to the categories of end‐users and to the service context.

Suggested Citation

  • Ian Kessler & Stephen Bach, 2011. "The Citizen‐Consumer as Industrial Relations Actor: New Ways of Working and the End‐user in Social Care," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 49(1), pages 80-102, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:49:y:2011:i:1:p:80-102
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8543.2009.00759.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Guy Bellemare, 2000. "End Users: Actors in the Industrial Relations System?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 38(3), pages 383-405, September.
    2. Edmund Heery & Carola Frege, 2006. "New Actors in Industrial Relations," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 44(4), pages 601-604, December.
    3. Marek Korczynski & Ursula Ott, 2004. "When Production and Consumption Meet: Cultural Contradictions and the Enchanting Myth of Customer Sovereignty," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(4), pages 575-599, June.
    4. Paul Osterman, 2006. "Community Organizing and Employee Representation," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 44(4), pages 629-649, December.
    5. Ronald L. Seeber & David B. Lipsky, 2006. "The Ascendancy of Employment Arbitrators in US Employment Relations: A New Actor in the American System?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 44(4), pages 719-756, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Benjamin Hopkins & Chris Dawson, 2016. "Migrant workers and involuntary non-permanent jobs: agencies as new IR actors?," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 163-180, March.
    2. Paul Blyton & Jean Jenkins, 2013. "Mobilizing Protest: Insights from Two Factory Closures," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 51(4), pages 733-753, December.
    3. Fang Cooke, 2014. "Chinese industrial relations research: In search of a broader analytical framework and representation," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 875-898, September.

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