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Mandatory versus voluntary labelling of genetically modified food: evidence from an economic experiment

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  • Astrid Dannenberg
  • Sara Scatasta
  • Bodo Sturm

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  • Astrid Dannenberg & Sara Scatasta & Bodo Sturm, 2011. "Mandatory versus voluntary labelling of genetically modified food: evidence from an economic experiment," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 42(3), pages 373-386, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:42:y:2011:i:3:p:373-386
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    Cited by:

    1. Yang, Ruoye & Raper, Kellie Curry & Lusk, Jayson L., 2017. "The Impact of Hormone Use Perception on Consumer Meat Preference," 2017 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Mobile, Alabama 252772, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    2. Nielsen, Thea, 2012. "How do Concerns about Pesticides Impact Consumer Willingness to Buy Genetically Modified French Fries in Germany? Results from a Purchasing Experiment," 2012 International European Forum, February 13-17, 2012, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 144986, International European Forum on System Dynamics and Innovation in Food Networks.
    3. Bansal, Sangeeta & Chakravarty, Sujoy & Ramaswami, Bharat, 2013. "The informational and signaling impacts of labels: experimental evidence from India on GM foods," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(06), pages 701-722, December.
    4. Lewis, Karen E. & Grebitus, Carola & Nayga, Rodolfo M., 2016. "U.S. consumers’ preferences for imported and genetically modified sugar: Examining policy consequentiality in a choice experiment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 1-8.
    5. Cem Iskender Aydin & Gokhan Ozertan & Begum Ozkaynak, 2011. "Should Turkey Adopt GM Crops? A Social Multi-Criteria Evaluation for the Case of Cotton Farming in Turkey," Working Papers 2011/07, Bogazici University, Department of Economics.

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