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Cultural Participation, Relational Goods and Individual Subjective Well-Being: Some Empirical Evidence

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Listed:
  • Giorgio Tavano Blessi

    () (Department of Sociology and Economic Law, Bologna University, Via San Giacomo 3, 40126, Bologna, ITALY)

  • Enzo Grossi

    () (Bracco Foundation, Via Cino del Duca, 8, 20122 Milano - ITALY)

  • Pier Luigi Sacco

    () (Faculty of Arts, Markets, and Heritage, IULM University, via Carlo Bo, 1, 20143 Milan, ITALY)

  • Giovanni Pieretti

    () (Department of Sociology and Economic Law, Bologna University, Via San Giacomo 3, 40126, Bologna, ITALY)

  • Guido Ferilli

    () (Faculty of Arts, Markets, and Heritage, IULM University, via Carlo Bo, 1, 20143 Milan, ITALY)

Abstract

This paper focuses on the role of cultural participation as a source of individual subjective well-being in terms of the sociability orientation of different cultural activities. In previous works, we have found a strong association between subjective well-being and cultural participation. Here, we want to test to what extent such as association can be ascribed to the fact that cultural participation allows individuals to engage in non instrumental forms of social interaction, which are conducive to genuine forms of interpersonal relations. The test is conducted through two different evidence bases: on a survey covering Italian population and focused on the relation between culture and well-being; and an online survey of experts, ranking the 14 culturally related activities of the previous survey in terms of their sociability orientation. Our findings show that cultural participation tends to be oriented preferentially toward relatively sociable activities, thereby contributing to the production of relational goods and social capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Giorgio Tavano Blessi & Enzo Grossi & Pier Luigi Sacco & Giovanni Pieretti & Guido Ferilli, 2014. "Cultural Participation, Relational Goods and Individual Subjective Well-Being: Some Empirical Evidence," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 4, pages 33-46, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bap:journl:140303
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Leonardo Becchetti & Alessandra Pelloni & Fiammetta Rossetti, 2008. "Relational Goods, Sociability, and Happiness," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 343-363, August.
    2. Maurizio Pugno, 2007. "The Subjective Well-being Paradox: A Suggested Solution Based on Relational Goods," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Happiness, chapter 14 Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    5. Lionel Prouteau & Fran├žois-Charles Wolff, 2004. "Relational Goods and Associational Participation," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 75(3), pages 431-463, September.
    6. Enzo Grossi & Giorgio Tavano Blessi & Pier Sacco & Massimo Buscema, 2012. "The Interaction Between Culture, Health and Psychological Well-Being: Data Mining from the Italian Culture and Well-Being Project," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, pages 129-148.
    7. Becchetti, Leonardo & Degli Antoni, Giacomo & Faillo, Marco, 2010. "Let's meet up! The role of relational goods in promoting cooperation," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 661-669, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Guido Bonatti & Enrico Ivaldi, 2016. "Un indicatore per la misurazione della partecipazione culturale e sociale nelle regioni italiane," ECONOMIA E DIRITTO DEL TERZIARIO, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2016(2), pages 283-302.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cultural participation; Relational goods; Individual subjective well-being; Psychological health;

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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