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Pricing Patterns And Implications For Competition Policy

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  • Constantin BELU

Abstract

In this paper we discuss different pricing patterns observed from actual data in oligopolistic markets and we are reviewing the most suitable econometric tools to analyze and disentangle patterns informative to competition policy.We argue that there are certain market situations where parallel pricing bears information that can be informative to antitrust authorities. We resort to co-integration analysis to prove that it is possible to identify patterns that can be interpreted as hallmark for collusive behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Constantin BELU, 2012. "Pricing Patterns And Implications For Competition Policy," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 10, pages 97-103, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:aic:revebs:y:2012:i:9:beluc
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Motta,Massimo, 2004. "Competition Policy," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521016919, July - De.
    2. Michael Noel, 2009. "Do retail gasoline prices respond asymmetrically to cost shocks? The influence of Edgeworth Cycles," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 40(3), pages 582-595, September.
    3. Buccirossi Paolo, 2006. "Does Parallel Behavior Provide Some Evidence of Collusion?," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 85-102, July.
    4. George Symeonidis, 2003. "In Which Industries is Collusion More Likely? Evidence from the UK," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 45-74, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    parallel pricing; Edgeworth price cycles; antitrust; collusive behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • K21 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law - - - Antitrust Law

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