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The Role Of Socioeconomic Factors And Lifestyle Variables In Attitude And The Demand For Genetically Modified Foods

Author

Listed:
  • Heiman, Amir
  • Just, David R.
  • Zilberman, David

Abstract

Consumer resistance is a key barrier to the diffusion of genetically modified foods (GMFs). Several studies have shown that consumers in general have a negative attitude toward GMFs. Through analysis of a survey conducted in Israel, we find consumer attitudes toward GMFs to be context specific, differing based on the available alternatives. Consumers responded positively to genetically modified meats when given the alternative choice of meats produced with hormones or dyes. We also address the importance of gender, education, and being religious on the consumer's attitude toward GMFs. Both education and being religious have significant effects on attitude, while gender does not.

Suggested Citation

  • Heiman, Amir & Just, David R. & Zilberman, David, 2000. "The Role Of Socioeconomic Factors And Lifestyle Variables In Attitude And The Demand For Genetically Modified Foods," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 18(3).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jloagb:14713
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/14713
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Traxler, Greg & Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Sain, Gustavo, 2000. "Genes, Germplasm And Developing Country Access To Genetically Modified Crop Varieties," Proceedings:Transitions in Agbiotech: Economics of Strategy and Policy, June 24-25, 1999, Washington, D.C. 25997, Regional Research Project NE-165 Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rimal, Arbindra & Moon, Wanki & Balasubramanian, Siva K., 2006. "Perceived Risks of Agro-Biotechnology and Organic Food Purchases in the United States," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 37(02), July.
    2. Hine, Susan E. & Loureiro, Maria L., 2002. "Understanding Consumers' Perceptions Toward Biotechnology And Labeling," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19898, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. repec:rss:jnljms:v1i11p5 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ventura, Vera & Frisio, Dario G. & Ferrazzi, Giovanni, 2015. "How Scary! An analysis of visual communication concerning genetically modified organisms in Italy," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211921, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Zilberman, David & Kaplan, Scott & Kim, Eunice & Waterfield, Gina, 2013. "Lessons from the California GM Labeling Proposition on the State of Crop Biotechnology," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149851, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Ahmad Mohammadpur & Karim Mahmoodi, 2016. "Lifestyle and identity in contemporary Iranian Kurdistan (a grounded study of Marivan City)," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(5), pages 1907-1928, September.

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