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The Role Of Economic Analysis In Local Government Decisions: The Case Of Solid Waste Management

  • Halstead, John M.
  • Park, William M.
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    The issue of solid waste management has risen to national prominence in the last decade, fueled by increasing waste disposal costs and changing public attitudes. This situation presents a major opportunity for economists to use their applied microeconomics skills to assist state and local governments manage waste in a cost effective fashion. While findings from formal research efforts may ultimately make their way into the decision-making process, perhaps economists can play an even more significant role in emphasizing the importance of the most basic economic concepts and principles for sound decision making in solid waste management or the many other areas in which local public choices are made. These areas would include at least the following: opportunity cost, marginal analysis of costs and benefits, and the role of economic incentives.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/31650
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    Article provided by Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association in its journal Agricultural and Resource Economics Review.

    Volume (Year): 25 (1996)
    Issue (Month): 1 (April)
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:31650
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.narea.org/

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    1. Steven C. Deller & John M. Halstead, 1994. "Efficiency in the Production of Rural Road Services: The Case of New England Towns," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 70(2), pages 247-259.
    2. Dooley, Frank J. & Bangsund, Dean A. & Leistritz, F. Larry & Fischer, William R., 1993. "Estimating Optimal Landfill Sizes and Locations in North Dakota," Agricultural Economics Reports 23366, North Dakota State University, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics.
    3. Kiel Katherine A. & McClain Katherine T., 1995. "House Prices during Siting Decision Stages: The Case of an Incinerator from Rumor through Operation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 241-255, March.
    4. Ready Mark J. & Ready Richard C., 1995. "Optimal Pricing of Depletable, Replaceable Resources: The Case of Landfill Tipping Fees," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 307-323, May.
    5. Fullerton Don & Kinnaman Thomas C., 1995. "Garbage, Recycling, and Illicit Burning or Dumping," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 78-91, July.
    6. Kunreuther, Howard & Kleindorfer, Paul & Knez, Peter J. & Yaksick, Rudy, 1987. "A compensation mechanism for siting noxious facilities: Theory and experimental design," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 371-383, December.
    7. Copeland, Brian R., 1991. "International trade in waste products in the presence of illegal disposal," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 143-162, March.
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