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Tourism, meditation, sustainability

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  • Lengyel, Attila

Abstract

The economic value of meditation based services is clearly demonstrated by a growing number of companies using such services. In the USA one quarter of the companies offer in-house meditation training to their employees. On the other hand, the number of those who think that the western consumption paradigm in its present form is unsustainable is also increasing. In addition to its business value, meditation and its most popular western form mindfulness is a practical tool that can catalyze a change in our world view and value system. A basic precondition for learning meditation techniques is to have an open, receptive, feminine attitude. As it is revealed in the present research, tourists poses a significantly elevated level of openness to new experience. This increased openness together with an upward trend for spiritual experiences can create a synergy for certain destinations, accommodation types, tourism locations to expand their service portfolio with meditation based services. While favourable physical and psychological effects of traditional tourism services fade within a few weeks, meditation is a portable tourism product which can be taken home and practiced regularly in a virtually cost-free way. By learning and practicing meditation the extremely poor physical and psychological condition of the Hungarian population could be improved in a preventive and cost-effective way. As the level of mindfulness is positively correlated with sustainable behaviour by offering meditation services tourism might take on a new level of significance in the battle for sustainability.

Suggested Citation

  • Lengyel, Attila, 2016. "Tourism, meditation, sustainability," APSTRACT: Applied Studies in Agribusiness and Commerce, AGRIMBA, vol. 10(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:apstra:244458
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/244458
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hyunyoung Choi & Hal Varian, 2012. "Predicting the Present with Google Trends," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(s1), pages 2-9, June.
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    4. Kirk Brown & Tim Kasser, 2005. "Are Psychological and Ecological Well-being Compatible? The Role of Values, Mindfulness, and Lifestyle," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 74(2), pages 349-368, November.
    5. Nick Wills-Johnson, 2010. "Lessons for sustainability from the world’s most sustainable culture," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 12(6), pages 909-925, December.
    6. Ericson, Torgeir & Kjønstad, Bjørn Gunaketu & Barstad, Anders, 2014. "Mindfulness and sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 73-79.
    7. Jessica Bloom & Sabine Geurts & Michiel Kompier, 2013. "Vacation (after-) effects on employee health and well-being, and the role of vacation activities, experiences and sleep," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 613-633, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    tourism; meditation; sustainability; openness to experience; trends; Health Economics and Policy; Z3;

    JEL classification:

    • Z3 - Other Special Topics - - Tourism Economics

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