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Farmers’ health and agricultural productivity in rural Ethiopia

Author

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  • Ulimwengu, John M.

Abstract

This paper estimates a stochastic production using household survey data to analyze the relationship between farmers’ health impediments and agricultural production efficiency in Ethiopia. The results show that healthy farmers produce more per unit of inputs, earn more income and supply more labor than farmers affected by sickness. The model results show that production inefficiency increases significantly with the number of days lost to sickness. This finding suggests that investing in the health sector in rural areas will not only improve farmers’ agricultural performance but also increase their income. Policymakers should therefore devise strategies that will maximize the contribution of health investments to agricultural productivity and the overall rural economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Ulimwengu, John M., 2009. "Farmers’ health and agricultural productivity in rural Ethiopia," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 3(2), September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:afjare:56902
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/56902
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Klasen, Stephan & Reimers, Malte, 2017. "Looking at Pro-Poor Growth from an Agricultural Perspective," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 147-168.
    2. Robinson, Sherman & Levy, Stephanie, 2014. "Can cash transfers promote the local economy? A case study for Cambodia:," IFPRI discussion papers 1334, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Yin-Chi Wang, 2011. "Health, Education and Development," 2011 Meeting Papers 1263, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Fink, Günther & Masiye, Felix, 2015. "Health and agricultural productivity: Evidence from Zambia," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 151-164.
    5. repec:oup:apecpp:v:39:y:2017:i:3:p:428-440. is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ulimwengu, John & Liverpool-Tasie, Saweda & Randriamamonjy, Josee & Ramadan, Racha, 2011. "Understanding the linkage between agricultural productivity and nutrient consumption: Evidence from Uganda," IFPRI discussion papers 1128, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. McNamara, Paul E. & Ulimwengu, John M. & Leonard, Kenneth L., 2010. "Do health investments improve agricultural productivity?," IFPRI discussion papers 1012, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Jean-Marc MONTAUD & Mahamadou Roufahi TANKARI, 2013. "When social goals meet economic goals: the double dividend of extending free access to healthcare in Uganda," Working Papers 2012-2013_8, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Jul 2013.
    9. Allen, Summer L. & Qaim, Matin, 2012. "Agricultural productivity and public expenditures in sub-saharan africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 1173, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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