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Carbon Sequestration, Co-Benefits, and Conservation Programs

Author

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  • Feng, Hongli
  • Kling, Catherine L.
  • Gassman, Philip W.

Abstract

Land retirement and other agricultural conservation actions contribute greenhouse gas offsets and water quality improvements and reduce erosion and nitrogen runoff. Shifting the programmatic focus to carbon would enhance C sequestration and reduce nitrogen runoff, but would likely increase erosion.

Suggested Citation

  • Feng, Hongli & Kling, Catherine L. & Gassman, Philip W., 2004. "Carbon Sequestration, Co-Benefits, and Conservation Programs," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 19(3).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaeach:94004
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hongli Feng & Lyubov A. Kurkalova & Catherine L. Kling & Philip W. Gassman, 2004. "Environmental Conservation in Agriculture: Land Retirement versus Changing Practices on Working Land," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 04-wp365, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    2. Andrew J. Plantinga & JunJie Wu, 2003. "Co-Benefits from Carbon Sequestration in Forests: Evaluating Reductions in Agricultural Externalities from an Afforestation Policy in Wisconsin," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(1), pages 74-85.
    3. Kurkalova, Lyubov A. & Kling, Catherine L. & Zhao, Jinhua, 2003. "Multiple Benefits of Carbon-Friendly Agricultural Practices: Empirical Assessment of Conservation Tillage in Iowa," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10194, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Schneider, Uwe A. & Kumar, Pushpam, 2008. "Greenhouse Gas Mitigation through Agriculture," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 23(1).
    5. Butt, Tanveer A. & McCarl, Bruce A., 2004. "Farm and Forest Carbon Sequestration: Can Producers Employ it to Make Some Money?," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 19(3).
    6. Matthews, Stephen & O'Connor, Raymond & Plantinga, Andrew J., 2002. "Quantifying the impacts on biodiversity of policies for carbon sequestration in forests," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 71-87, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John M. Antle & Roberto O. Valdivia, 2006. "Modelling the supply of ecosystem services from agriculture: a minimum-data approach ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 50(1), pages 1-15, March.
    2. Stephen P. Holland, 2010. "Spillovers from Climate Policy," NBER Working Papers 16158, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Fuwa, Nobuhiko & Sajise, Asa, 2008. "Exploring Environmental Services Incentive Policies for the Philippine Rice Sector: The Case of Intra-Species Agro Biodiversity Conservation," MPRA Paper 23691, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Kinuthia, Emmanuel K., 2010. "The Effects Of The International Smallgroup And Tree Planting Program On Household Income In Nyeri District, Kenya," Research Theses 117709, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    5. Hediger, Werner, 2009. "The non-permanence of optimal soil carbon sequestration," 83rd Annual Conference, March 30-April 1, 2009, Dublin, Ireland 51057, Agricultural Economics Society.
    6. Gascoigne, William R. & Hoag, Dana & Koontz, Lynne & Tangen, Brian A. & Shaffer, Terry L. & Gleason, Robert A., 2011. "Valuing ecosystem and economic services across land-use scenarios in the Prairie Pothole Region of the Dakotas, USA," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(10), pages 1715-1725, August.
    7. Stephen P. Holland, 2011. "Spillovers from Climate Policy to Other Pollutants," NBER Chapters,in: The Design and Implementation of U.S. Climate Policy, pages 79-90 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy;

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