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Nation Building and Economic Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Ellyn Creasey
  • Ahmed S. Rahman
  • Katherine A. Smith

Abstract

Over the past half-century there have been over three hundred instances of nation building initiatives, episodes where countries jointly give military and economic aid to a country embroiled in conflict. Despite the prevalence and expense of this foreign policy, little research has explored the potential growth effects from these operations. This project uses a standard growth regression framework to quantify the effects of nation building on GDP per capita growth of the recipient nation. The research considers how the characteristics of conflict zones and the interaction of diverse types of both military and economic aid impact the development process.

Suggested Citation

  • Ellyn Creasey & Ahmed S. Rahman & Katherine A. Smith, 2012. "Nation Building and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 278-282, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:102:y:2012:i:3:p:278-82
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.102.3.278
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert M. Solow, 1956. "A Contribution to the Theory of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(1), pages 65-94.
    2. Yamarik Steven J & Johnson Noel D & Compton Ryan A, 2010. "War! What Is It Good For? A Deep Determinants Analysis of the Cost of Interstate Conflict," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 1-35, September.
    3. Nazrul Islam, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-1170.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander F. McQuoid & J. Britton Haynes Jr., 2017. "The Thin (Red) Blue Line: Police Militarization and Violent Crime," Departmental Working Papers 56, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
    2. Michael Insler & Bryce McMurrey & Alexander F. McQuoid, 2016. "From Broken Windows to Broken Bonds: Militarized Police and Social Fragmentation," Departmental Working Papers 53, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.

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