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Is Academic Economics Withering in Australia?

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  • John Lodewijks
  • Tony Stokes

Abstract

Departments of economics in Australia have not fared well recently. Many have been closed, merged or relocated, their staff made redundant while economics degrees and majors have been eliminated. This article tries to understand why academic economics appears to be withering in this country, or at least increasingly concentrated in Group of Eight (Go8) universities, and what if anything can still be done to preserve what is left.

Suggested Citation

  • John Lodewijks & Tony Stokes, 2014. "Is Academic Economics Withering in Australia?," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 21(1), pages 69-90.
  • Handle: RePEc:acb:agenda:v:21:y:2014:i:1:p:69-90
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    File URL: http://press-files.anu.edu.au/downloads/press/p302941/pdf/Is-Academic-Economics-Withering-in-Australia.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Harry Bloch, 2012. "An Uneven Playing Field: Rankings and Ratings for Economics in ERA 2010," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 31(4), pages 418-427, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lodewijks, John & Stokes, Anthony & Wright, Sarah, 2016. "Economics: An elite subject soon only available in elite universities?," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 1-9.
    2. Anita Doraisami & Alex Millmow, 2016. "Funding Australian economics research: Local benefits?," The Economic and Labour Relations Review, , vol. 27(4), pages 511-524, December.
    3. Robert Hoffmann & Swee Hoon Chuah & Jason Potts, 2017. "Behavioral policy and its stakeholders," Journal of Behavioral Economics for Policy, Society for the Advancement of Behavioral Economics (SABE), vol. 1(S), pages 5-8, November.

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