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Flexibilisation without hesitation? Temporary contracts and workers' satisfaction

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  • Chadi, Adrian
  • Hetschko, Clemens

Abstract

Fixed-term contracts are often considered a key policy tool for increasing employment. As we show that contract limitation lowers job satisfaction using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel study, we detect a drawback of promoting temporary employment that has not been identified so far. We find that the honeymoon-hangover effect of a new job must be taken into account to reveal this result. We examine reasons why employees suffer from temporary contracts and analyse the Flexicurity idea of compensating workers with security. Our findings contribute to research on workers` well-being as well as to the debate on labour market flexibilisation. --

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics in its series Discussion Papers with number 2013/3.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:fubsbe:20133

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Keywords: labour market; flexibilisation; job satisfaction; temporary contracts;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Eve Caroli & Mathilde Godard, 2013. "Does Job Insecurity Deteriorate Health ? A Causal Approach for Europe," Working Papers 2013-13, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  2. Chris Dawson & Michail Veliziotis, 2013. "Temporary employment, job satisfaction and subjective well-being," Working Papers 20131309, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  3. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & McVicar, Duncan & Wooden, Mark, 2013. "Non-Standard 'Contingent' Employment and Job Satisfaction: A Panel Data Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 7590, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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