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Birth Spacing and Child Survival: Comparative Evidence from India and Pakistan

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  • Pushkar Maitra

    (Monash University)

  • Sarmistha Pal

    (Brunel University)

Abstract

In view of higher fertility and mortality rates in Pakistan compared to India, this paper examines the two-way relationship between birth interval and child mortality and compares the behaviour of households in the Indian and Pakistani provinces of Punjab. Birth interval and child survival are modelled here as correlated hazard processes to address the bias generated by the simultaneity between spacing and survival. We find evidence of significant mutual dependence between birth interval and child survival in both samples. We also identify a close correspondence between birth interval and duration of breastfeeding and argue that the duration of breastfeeding is a good instrument of birth spacing in our samples. There are also interesting differences between Indian and Pakistani households with respect to effects of son preference and female literacy. We argue that part of these differences could be explained by differences in religion and state policies in these two neighbouring states.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/lab/papers/0509/0509010.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Labor and Demography with number 0509010.

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Length: 60 pages
Date of creation: 27 Sep 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0509010

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 60. Revised version
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: Birth spacing; Child survival; Sibling competition and child replacement effects; Religion and state policy; Correlated hazards models; Simultaneity bias.;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Sonia Bhalotra & Arthur van Soest, 2007. "Birth Spacing, Fertility and Neonatal Mortality in India:Dynamics, Frailty and Fecundity," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 07/168, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  2. Pushkar Maitra & Sarmistha Pal, 2007. "Early Childbirth, Health Inputs and Child Mortality: Recent Evidence from Bangladesh," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 07-05, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.

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