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Sectoral Restructuring and Labor Mobility: A Comparative Look at the Czech Republic

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  • Vit Sorm
  • Katherine Terrell

Abstract

Labor mobility is crucial for an efficient allocation of resources and the transition economies are often viewed as suffering from inadequate reallocation of labor. Using quarterly micro data for the 1994-1998 period, we provide a comparative analysis of the extent and determinants of labor mobility in the Czech Republic. We show there has been significant movement into the finance, trade, and tourism sectors and out of the agricultural and industrial sectors. Over half of the people who change jobs have changed sector of employment, and this restructuring has been carried out relatively efficiently in that it occurred with lower incidence and duration of unemployment than in the other transition economies. The demographic characteristics of different patterns of mobility are similar across these transition economies: we identify younger people in general and single men as individuals who more likely to change jobs or become unemployed. The more educated are experiencing more job stability and are more likely to be hired if unemployed or out of the labor force. Finally, we find in the Czech Republic, the flows between employment and unemployment are very responsive to demand conditions. Hence, we conclude that the Czech labor market is demonstrating flexibility and efficiency in the transition

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan in its series William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series with number 273.

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Length: pages
Date of creation: 01 Nov 1999
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Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:1999-273

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  1. Lehmann, Hartmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 1999. "Tenures that Shook the World: Worker Turnover in Russia, Poland and Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 90, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Alan B. Krueger & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1992. "A Comparative Analysis of East and West German Labor Markets: Before and After Unification," NBER Working Papers 4154, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Petrongolo, Barbara, 2001. "Reemployment Probabilities and Returns to Matching," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(3), pages 716-41, July.
  4. Swati Basu & Saul Estrin & Jan Svejnar, 2000. "Employment and Wages in Enterprises Under Communism and in Transition: Evidence from Central Europe and Russia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 114, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  5. Bellmann Lutz & Estrin Saul & Lehmann Hartmut & Wadsworth Jonathan, 1995. "The Eastern German Labor Market in Transition: Gross Flow Estimates from Panel Data," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 139-170, April.
  6. John S. Earle, 1997. "Industrial Decline and Labor Reallocation in Romania," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 118, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  7. Foley, M.C., 1997. "Labor Market Dynamics in Russia," Papers 780, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  8. Ham, John C & Svejnar, Jan & Terrell, Katherine, 1998. "Unemployment and the Social Safety Net during Transitions to a Market Economy: Evidence from the Czech and Slovak Republics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1117-42, December.
  9. Mark C. Foley, 1997. "Labor Market Dynamics in Russia," Working Papers 780, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
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