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Modeling and predicting the CBOE market volatility index

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Author Info

  • Marcelo Fernandes

    ()
    (Queen Mary, University of London)

  • Marcelo Cunha Medeiros

    ()
    (Department of Economics, PUC-Rio)

  • MArcelo Scharth

    ()

Abstract

This paper performs a thorough statistical examination of the time-series properties of the market volatility index (VIX) from the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE). The motivation lies on the widespread consensus that the VIX is a barometer to the overall market sentiment as to what concerns risk appetite. To assess the statistical behavior of the time series, we run a series of preliminary analyses whose results suggest there is some long-range dependence in the VIX index. This is consistent with the strong empirical evidence in the literature supporting long memory in both options-implied and realized volatilities. We thus resort to linear and nonlinear heterogeneous autoregressive (HAR) processes, including smooth transition and threshold HAR-type models, as well as to smooth transition autoregressive trees (START) for modeling and forecasting purposes. The in-sample results for the HAR-type indicate that they cope with the long-range dependence in the VIX time series as well as the more popular ARFIMA model. In addition, the highly nonlinear START specification also does a god job in controlling for the long memory. The out-of-sample analysis evince that the linear ARMA and ARFIMA models perform very well in the short run and very poorly in the long-run, whereas the START model entails by far the best results for the longer horizon despite of failing at shorter horizons. In contrast, the HAR-type models entail reasonable relative performances in most horizons. Finally, we also show how a simple forecast combination brings about great improvements in terms of predictive ability for most horizons.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil) in its series Textos para discussão with number 548.

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Length: 35p
Date of creation: Aug 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rio:texdis:548

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Keywords: heterogeneous autoregression; implied volatility; smooth transition; VIX.;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Shawkat Hammoudeh & Tengdong Liu & Chia-Lin Chang & Michael McAleer, 2011. "Risk Spillovers in Oil-Related CDS, Stock and Credit Markets," Working Papers in Economics 11/17, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
  2. Filip Zikes & Jozef Barunik, 2013. "Semiparametric Conditional Quantile Models for Financial Returns and Realized Volatility," Papers 1308.4276, arXiv.org.
  3. Massimiliano Caporin & Eduardo Rossi & Paolo Santucci de Magistris, 2011. "Conditional jumps in volatility and their economic determinants," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0138, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".

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