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Oil Price Shocks and U.S. Economic Activity: An International Perspective

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  • Balke, Nathan S.
  • Brown, Stephen P.A.

    ()
    (Resources for the Future)

  • Yucel, Mine K.

Abstract

Oil price shocks are thought to have played a prominent role in U.S. economic activity. In this paper, we employ Bayesian methods with a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model of world economic activity to identify the various sources of oil price shocks and economic fluctuation and to assess their effects on U.S. economic activity. We find that changes in oil prices are best understood as endogenous. Oil price shocks in the 1970s and early 1980s and the 2000s reflect differing mixes of shifts in oil supply and demand, and differing sources of oil price shocks have differing effects on economic activity. We also find that U.S. output fluctuations owe mostly to domestic shocks, with productivity shocks contributing to weakness in the 1970s and 1980s and strength in the 2000s.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Resources For the Future in its series Discussion Papers with number dp-10-37.

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Date of creation: 23 Jul 2010
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Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-10-37

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Related research

Keywords: oil price; international business cycles; general equilibrium; Bayesian estimation;

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  1. Chang-Jin Kim & Charles R. Nelson, 1999. "Has The U.S. Economy Become More Stable? A Bayesian Approach Based On A Markov-Switching Model Of The Business Cycle," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 608-616, November.
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Cited by:
  1. Nikolaos Antonakakis & Ioannis Chatziantoniou & George Filis, 2014. "Dynamic Spillovers of Oil Price Shocks and Policy Uncertainty," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp166, Vienna University of Economics, Department of Economics.
  2. Luca Guerrieri & Martin Bodenstein, 2012. "Oil Efficiency, Demand, and Prices: a Tale of Ups and Downs," 2012 Meeting Papers 25, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Vipin Arora & Pedro Gomis-Porqueras, 2011. "Oil Price Dynamics in a Real Business Cycle Model," CAMA Working Papers 2011-17, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  4. Garth Heutel, 2011. "Online Appendix to "How Should Environmental Policy Respond to Business Cycles? Optimal Policy under Persistent Productivity Shocks"," Technical Appendices 10-62, Review of Economic Dynamics.
  5. Heutel, Garth, 2011. "How Should Environmental Policy Respond to Business Cycles? Optimal Policy under Persistent Productivity Shocks," Working Papers 11-8, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.

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