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Social Networks and the Decision to Insure

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  • Cai, Jing
  • de Janvry, Alain
  • Sadoulet, Elisabeth

Abstract

Using data from a randomized experiment in rural China, this paper studies the influence of social networks on weather insurance adoption and the mechanisms through which social networks operate. To quantify network effects, the experiment offers intensive information sessions about the insurance product to a random subset of farmers. For untreated farmers, the effect of having an additional treated friend on take-up is equivalent to granting a 15% reduction in the insurance premium. By varying the information available about peers’ decisions and using randomized default options, the experiment shows that the network effect is driven by the diffusion of insurance knowledge rather than purchase decisions.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 46861.

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Date of creation: 09 May 2013
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:46861

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Keywords: Social network; Insurance demand; Learning;

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  1. Gerlinde Fellner & Rupert Sausgruber & Christian Traxler, 2009. "Testing Enforcement Strategies in the Field: Legal Threat, Moral Appeal and Social Information," Working Papers 2009-23, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
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Cited by:
  1. Bruhn, Miriam & Lara Ibarra, Gabriel & McKenzie, David, 2013. "Why is voluntary financial education so unpopular ? Experimental evidence from Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6439, The World Bank.
  2. Miller, Margaret & Reichelstein, Julia & Salas, Christian & Zia, Bilal, 2014. "Can you help someone become financially capable ? a meta-analysis of the literature," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6745, The World Bank.
  3. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2013. "The Economic Importance of Financial Literacy: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 18952, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq & Rosenzweig, Mark, 2014. "Risk, Insurance and Wages in General Equilibrium," CEPR Discussion Papers 9797, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Noam Yuchtman & Florian Ederer & Bruno Ferman & Leonardo Bursztyn, 2013. "Understanding Peer Effects in Financial Decisions: Evidence from a Field Experiment," 2013 Meeting Papers 222, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Lena Giesbert & Susan Steiner, 2014. "Client perceptions of the value of microinsurance: evidence from southern Ghana," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 19214, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  7. Xu, Lisa & Zia, Bilal, 2012. "Financial literacy around the world : an overview of the evidence with practical suggestions for the way forward," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6107, The World Bank.

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