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The Impact of Schooling on the Timing of Marriage and Fertility: Evidence from a Change in Compulsory Schooling Law

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  • Kirdar, Murat G.
  • Dayıoğlu, Meltem
  • Koç, İsmet
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    Abstract

    This paper estimates the impact of schooling on the timing of marriage and early fertility using the 2003 Turkish Demographic and Health Survey and duration analysis methodology. The source of exogenous variation in schooling is the extension of compulsory schooling in Turkey in 1997. The findings indicate that at age 17 –three years after the completion of compulsory schooling –, the proportion of women who are married drops from 15.2 to 10 percent and the proportion of women who have given birth falls from 6.2 to 3.5 percent as a result of the new policy. This implies that the impact of increased schooling on marriage and early fertility persists beyond the completion of compulsory schooling for an important duration. In addition, the delay in the timing of first-birth is driven from the delay in the timing of marriage. After a woman is married, schooling does not have an effect on the duration until her first-birth.

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    File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/13410/
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 13410.

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    Date of creation: Feb 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:13410

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    Keywords: Age at marriage; Fertility; Education; Compulsory Schooling; Turkey;

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    1. Osili, Una Okonkwo & Long, Bridget Terry, 2008. "Does female schooling reduce fertility? Evidence from Nigeria," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 57-75, August.
    2. Schultz, T Paul, 1994. "Human Capital, Family Planning, and Their Effects on Population Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 255-60, May.
    3. E. Tawiah, 1984. "Determinants Of Cumulative Fertility In Ghana," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 1-8, February.
    4. Esther Duflo, 2001. "Schooling and Labor Market Consequences of School Construction in Indonesia: Evidence from an Unusual Policy Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 795-813, September.
    5. Lucia Breierova & Esther Duflo, 2003. "The Impact of Education on Fertility and Child Mortality: Do Fathers Really Matter Less Than Mothers?," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 217, OECD Publishing.
    6. James Raymo, 2003. "Educational attainment and the transition to first marriage among Japanese women," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 83-103, February.
    7. Paul Glewwe, 2002. "Schools and Skills in Developing Countries: Education Policies and Socioeconomic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 436-482, June.
    8. Duncan Thomas & John Strauss & Maria-Helena Henriques, 1991. "How Does Mother's Education Affect Child Height?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 183-211.
    9. Paul Schultz, T., 2002. "Why Governments Should Invest More to Educate Girls," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 207-225, February.
    10. Lars Lefgren & Frank McIntyre, 2006. "The Relationship between Women's Education and Marriage Outcomes," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(4), pages 787-830, October.
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    Cited by:
    1. Powdthavee, Nattavudh & Adireksombat, Kampon, 2010. "From Classroom to Wedding Aisle: The Effect of a Nationwide Change in the Compulsory Schooling Law on Age at First Marriage in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 5019, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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