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National IQ means, calibrated and transformed from educational attainment, and their underlying gene frequencies

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  • Weiss, Volkmar

Abstract

Any general statement as to whether the secular trend of a society is eugenic or dysgenic depends upon a reliable calibration of the measurement of general intelligence. Richard Lynn set the mean IQ of the United Kingdom at 100 with a standard deviation of 15, and he calculated the mean IQs of other countries in relation to this “Greenwich IQ”. But because the UK test scores could be declining, the present paper recalibrates the mean IQ 100 to the average of seven countries having a historical mean IQ of 100. By comparing Lynn-Vanhanen-IQ with PISA scores and educational attainment of native and foreign born populations transformed into the IQ metric, we confirmed brain gain and brain drain in a number of nations during recent decades. Furthermore, the growth of gross domestic product per capita can be derived as a linear function of the percentage of people with an IQ above 105 and its underlying frequency of a hypothetical major gene of intelligence.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 13239.

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Date of creation: 08 Aug 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:13239

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Keywords: General intelligence; PISA; GDP; Dysgenics; Smart fraction theory; Immigration; Brain Gain; Brain Drain;

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  1. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2000. "Natural Selection and the Origin of economic Growth," Working Papers 2000-18, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  2. Ludger Woessmann, 2007. "Fundamental Determinants of School Efficiency and Equity: German States as a Microcosm for OECD Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 1981, CESifo Group Munich.
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  4. Bishop, John Hillman, 1989. "Is the Test Score Decline Responsible for the Productivity Growth Decline?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 178-97, March.
  5. Samuel Bowles & Herbert Gintis, 2002. "The Inheritance of Inequality," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 3-30, Summer.
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  7. Burdett, Kenneth, 1978. "The testing and sorting functions of higher education," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 117-122, August.
  8. Ewert, Ulf Christian, 2006. "The biological standard of living on the decline: Episodes from Germany during early industrialisation," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(01), pages 51-88, April.
  9. Arrow, Kenneth J., 1973. "Higher education as a filter," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 193-216, July.
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