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Adverse Selection, Reputation and Sudden Collapses in Secondary Loan Markets

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  • V.V. Chari
  • Ali Shourideh
  • Ariel Zetlin-Jones

Abstract

Banks and financial intermediaries that originate loans often sell some of these loans or securitize them in secondary loan markets and hold on to others. New issuances in such secondary markets collapse abruptly on occasion, typically when collateral values used to secure the underlying loans fall. These collapses are viewed by policymakers as signs that the market is not functioning efficiently. In this paper, we develop a dynamic adverse selection model in which small reductions in collateral values can generate abrupt inefficient collapses in new issuances in the secondary loan market. In our model, reductions in collateral values worsen the adverse selection problem and induce some potential sellers to hold on to their loans. Reputational incentives induce a large fraction of potential sellers to hold on to their loans rather than sell them in the secondary market. We find that a variety of policies that have been proposed during the recent crisis to remedy market inefficiencies do not help resolve the adverse selection problem.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16080.

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Date of creation: Jun 2010
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16080

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Cited by:
  1. Sudipto Bhattacharya & Georgy Chabakauri & Kjell G. Nyborg, 2011. "Securitized lending, asymmetric information, and financial crisis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 43166, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Moore, John, 2013. "Contagious Illiquidity I: Contagion through Time," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-73, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
  3. Kyungmin Kim & Benjamin Lester & Braz Camargo, 2012. "Subsidizing Price Discovery," 2012 Meeting Papers 338, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Hajime Tomura, 2012. "Asset Illiquidity and Market Shutdowns in Competitive Equilibrium," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(3), pages 283-294, July.
  5. Veronica Guerrieri & Robert Shimer, 2012. "Dynamic Adverse Selection: A Theory of Illiquidity, Fire Sales, and Flight to Quality," NBER Working Papers 17876, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Braz Camargo & Benjamin Lester, 2011. "Trading dynamics in decentralized markets with adverse selection," Working Papers 11-36, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  7. Sudipto Bhattacharya & Georgy Chabakauri & Kjell G. Nyborg, 2012. "Securitized Banking, Asymmetric Information, and Financial Crisis: Regulating Systemic Risk Away," FMG Discussion Papers dp704, Financial Markets Group.
  8. Ugo Albertazzi & Ginette Eramo & Leonardo Gambacorta & Carmelo Salleo, 2011. "Securitization is not that evil after all," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 796, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  9. Robert Shimer & Veronica Guerrieri, 2013. "Markets with Multidimensional Private Information," 2013 Meeting Papers 210, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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