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Adverse Selection and the Required Return

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  • Nicolae Gârleanu

Abstract

An important feature of financial markets is that securities are traded repeatedly by asymmetrically informed investors. We study how current and future adverse selection affect the required return. We find that the bid-ask spread generated by adverse selection is not a cost, on average, for agents who trade, and hence the bid-ask spread does not directly influence the required return. Adverse selection contributes to trading-decision distortions, however, implying allocation costs, which affect the required return. We explicitly derive the effect of adverse selection on required returns, and show how our result differs from models that consider the bid-ask spread to be an exogenous cost. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/rfs/hhg032
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Society for Financial Studies in its journal The Review of Financial Studies.

Volume (Year): 17 (2004)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 643-665

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Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:17:y:2004:i:3:p:643-665

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Cited by:
  1. Banerjee, Snehal & Graveline, Jeremy J., 2014. "Trading in derivatives when the underlying is scarce," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(3), pages 589-608.
  2. James J. Choi & Li Jin & Hongjun Yan, 2013. "Informed Trading and Expected Returns," NBER Working Papers 18680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Kang, Moonsoo, 2010. "Probability of information-based trading and the January effect," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2985-2994, December.
  4. Vayanos, Dimitri & Wang, Jiang, 2009. "Liquidity and Asset Prices: A Unified Framework," CEPR Discussion Papers 7410, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Turan G. Bali & Lin Peng & Yannan Shen & Yi Tang, 2013. "Liquidity Shocks and Stock Market Reactions," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1304, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
  6. Acharya, Viral V & Pedersen, Lasse Heje, 2003. "Asset Pricing with Liquidity Risk," CEPR Discussion Papers 3749, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Dimitri Vayanos & Jiang Wang, 2012. "Market Liquidity — Theory and Empirical Evidence," NBER Working Papers 18251, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Christian Leuz & Catherine Schrand, 2009. "Disclosure and the Cost of Capital: Evidence from Firms’ Responses to the Enron Shock," NBER Working Papers 14897, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Gârleanu, Nicolae, 2009. "Portfolio choice and pricing in illiquid markets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 144(2), pages 532-564, March.
  10. Anginer, Deniz, 2010. "Liquidity clienteles : transaction costs and investment decisions of individual investors," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5318, The World Bank.
  11. Korajczyk, Robert A. & Sadka, Ronnie, 2008. "Pricing the commonality across alternative measures of liquidity," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 45-72, January.

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