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Internationalization of U.S. Doctorate Education

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  • John Bound
  • Sarah Turner
  • Patrick Walsh

Abstract

The representation of a large number of students born outside the United States among the ranks of doctorate recipients from U.S. universities is one of the most significant transformations in U.S. graduate education and the international market for highly-trained workers in science and engineering in the last quarter century. Students from outside the U.S. accounted for 51% of PhD recipients in science and engineering fields in 2003, up from 27% in 1973. In the physical sciences, engineering and economics the representation of foreign students among PhD recipients is yet more striking; among doctorate recipients in 2003, those from outside the U.S. accounted for 50% of degrees in the physical sciences, 67% in engineering and 68% in economics. Our analysis highlights the important role of changes in demand among foreign born in explaining the growth and distribution of doctorates awarded in science and engineering. Expansion in undergraduate degree receipt in many countries has a direct effect on the demand for advanced training in the U.S. Changes in the supply side of the U.S. graduate education market may also differentially affect the representation of foreign students in U.S. universities. Supply shocks such as increases in federal support for the sciences will have relatively large effects on the representation in the U.S. of doctorate students from countries where demand is relatively elastic. Understanding the determinants -- and consequences -- of changes over time in the representation of foreign born students among doctorate recipients from U.S. universities informs the design of policies affecting the science and engineering workforce.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 14792.

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Date of creation: Mar 2009
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Publication status: published as Internationalization of U.S. Doctorate Education , John Bound, Sarah Turner, Patrick Walsh. in Science and Engineering Careers in the United States: An Analysis of Markets and Employment , Freeman and Goroff. 2009
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14792

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  1. Richard B. Freeman & Tanwin Chang & Hanley Chiang, 2009. "Supporting "The Best and Brightest" in Science and Engineering: NSF Graduate Research Fellowships," NBER Chapters, in: Science and Engineering Careers in the United States: An Analysis of Markets and Employment, pages 19-57 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Richard B. Freeman & Emily Jin & Chia-Yu Shen, 2004. "Where Do New US-Trained Science-Engineering PhDs come from?," NBER Working Papers 10554, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz, 2011. "Migration and Education," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2011011, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  2. Jeffrey Grogger & Gordon H. Hanson, 2013. "Attracting Talent: Location Choices of Foreign-Born PhDs in the US," NBER Working Papers 18780, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Paula E. Stephan, 2010. "The “I’s” Have It: Immigration and Innovation, the Perspective from Academe," NBER Chapters, in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 10, pages 83-127 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. McAusland, Carol & Kuhn, Peter, 2011. "Bidding for brains: Intellectual property rights and the international migration of knowledge workers," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 77-87, May.
  5. William Shobe & John L. Knapp, 2007. "The Economic Impact of the University of Virginia: How a Major Research University Affects the Local and State Economies," Reports 2007-01, Center for Economic and Policy Studies.
  6. Ding, Lan & Li, Haizheng, 2012. "Social networks and study abroad — The case of Chinese visiting students in the US," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 580-589.
  7. Paula Stephan & Chiara Franzoni & Giuseppe Scellato, 2013. "Choice of Country by the Foreign Born for PhD and Postdoctoral Study: A Sixteen-Country Perspective," NBER Working Papers 18809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. John Bound & Sarah Turner, 2010. "Coming to America: Where Do International Doctorate Students Study and How Do US Universities Respond?," NBER Chapters, in: American Universities in a Global Market, pages 101-127 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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