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Behavioral Economics and Health Economics

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  • Richard G. Frank
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    Abstract

    The health sector is filled with institutions and decision-making circumstances that create friction in markets and cognitive errors by decision makers. This paper examines the potential contributions to health economics of the ideas of behavioral economics. The discussion presented here focuses on the economics of doctor-patient interactions and some aspects of quality of care. It also touches on issues related to insurance and the demand for health care. The paper argues that long standing research impasses may be aided by applying concepts from behavioral economics.

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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w10881.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 10881.

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    Date of creation: Nov 2004
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    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10881

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    References

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    Cited by:
    1. David C. Grabowski, & David G. Stevenson & Haiden A. Huskamp & Nancy L. Keating, 2005. "The Influence of Medicare Home Health Payment Incentives: Does Payer Source Matter?," PGDA Working Papers 0605, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    2. Tibor Besedeš & Cary Deck & Sudipta Sarangi & Mikhael Shor, 2012. "Age Effects and Heuristics in Decision Making," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(2), pages 580-595, May.
    3. Brahmbhatt, Milan & Dutta, Arindam, 2008. "On SARS type economic effects during infectious disease outbreaks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4466, The World Bank.
    4. Javitt, Jonathan C. & Rebitzer, James B. & Reisman, Lonny, 2008. "Information technology and medical missteps: Evidence from a randomized trial," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 585-602, May.
    5. Vincze, János, 2010. "Miért és mitől védjük a fogyasztókat?. Aszimmetrikus információ és/vagy korlátozott racionalitás
      [Asymmetric information and/or bounded rationality: why are consumers protected and from
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(9), pages 725-752.
    6. Ryota Nakamura & Marc Suhrcke & Daniel John Zizzo, 2014. "A Triple Test for Behavioral Economics Models and Public Health Policy," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 14-01, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    7. Barr, Abigail & Lindelow, Magnus & Serneels, Pieter, 2009. "Corruption in public service delivery: An experimental analysis," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 225-239, October.
    8. Ian McCarthy & Rusty Tchernis, 2008. "Search Costs and Medicare Plan Choice," Caepr Working Papers 2008-004, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
    9. Matthias Wrede, 2005. "Health Values, Preference Inconsistency, and Insurance Demand," CESifo Working Paper Series 1634, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. David C. Grabowski & Jonathan Gruber & Joseph J. Angelelli, 2006. "Nursing Home Quality as a Public Good," NBER Working Papers 12361, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Jonathan Skinner & Douglas Staiger, 2005. "Technology Adoption From Hybrid Corn to Beta Blockers," NBER Working Papers 11251, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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