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How do doctors behave when some (but not all) of their patients are in managed care?

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  • Glied, Sherry
  • Zivin, Joshua Graff

Abstract

Most physicians today treat a variety of patients within their practices and operate in markets where a variety of insurance arrangements co-exist. In this paper, we propose several theoretical explanations for physician treatment patterns when the patient population is heterogeneous at the practice and market level. Data from the 1993-1996 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) are used to test how practice-level and market-level HMO penetration affect treatment intensity. Practice composition has strong effects on treatment. HMO-dominated practices have shorter, but otherwise more treatment intensive visits than do other practices. Market characteristics are less important determinants of treatment. As HMO practice share rises, the differences between the treatment of non-HMO and HMO patients are attenuated. These results provide strong evidence for a model of physician behavior with fixed costs of effort in the form of visit duration. For tests ordered, medications prescribed, and return visits specified, the empirical evidence supports a model with marginal cost pricing for excess capacity. HMO and non-HMO treatment patterns are most distinct at the level of the practice, not the patient. HMO-dominated practices appear to use a practice style that is quite different from that used in other practices. These findings suggest that practices are likely to become more segregated over time.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 21 (2002)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 337-353

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:21:y:2002:i:2:p:337-353

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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  1. Glied, Sherry, 2000. "Managed care," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 13, pages 707-753 Elsevier.
  2. Glied, Sherry, 1998. "Payment Heterogeneity, Physician Practice, and Access to Care," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 127-31, May.
  3. McGuire, Thomas G. & Pauly, Mark V., 1991. "Physician response to fee changes with multiple payers," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 385-410.
  4. McGuire, Thomas G., 2000. "Physician agency," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 9, pages 461-536 Elsevier.
  5. Sheshinski, Eytan, 1976. "Price, Quality and Quantity Regulation in Monopoly Situations," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 43(17), pages 127-37, May.
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