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Economics and mental health

In: Handbook of Health Economics

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  • Frank, Richard G.
  • McGuire, Thomas G.
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    Abstract

    This paper is concerned with the economics of mental health. We argue that mental health economics is like health economics only more so: uncertainty and variation in treatments are greater; the assumption of patient self-interested behavior is more dubious; response to financial incentives such as insurance is exacerbated; the social consequences and external costs of illness are more formidable. We elaborate on these statements and consider their implications throughout the chapter. "Special characteristics" of mental illness and persons with mental illness are identified and related to observations on institutions paying for and providing mental health services. We show that adverse selection and moral hazard appear to hit mental health markets with special force. We discuss the emergence of new institutions within managed care that address longstanding problems in the sector. Finally, we trace the shifting role of government in this sector of the health economy.

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    This chapter was published in:

  • A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), 2000. "Handbook of Health Economics," Handbook of Health Economics, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 1, number 1, 00.
    This item is provided by Elsevier in its series Handbook of Health Economics with number 1-16.

    Handle: RePEc:eee:heachp:1-16

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookseriesdescription.cws_home/BS_HE/description

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    Cited by:
    1. repec:ese:iserwp:2003-02 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Karen Eggleston & Richard Zeckhauser, 2002. "Government Contracting for Health Care," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0202, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    3. Sara Markowitz & Jonathan Klick, . "Are Mental Health Insurance Mandates Effective?: Evidence from Suicides," Working Papers Rutgers University, Newark 2004-003, Department of Economics, Rutgers University, Newark.
    4. Neeraj Sood & Melinda Beeuwkes Buntin & Jose J. Escarce, 2006. "Does How Much and How You Pay Matter? Evidence from the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System," NBER Working Papers 12556, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Jeff Desimone & Sara Markowitz, 2003. "The effect of price on counselling sessions attended by depression patients," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(14), pages 899-903.
    6. Jens Ludwig & Dave E. Marcotte & Karen Norberg, 2007. "Anti-depressants and Suicide," NBER Working Papers 12906, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Richard G. Frank, 2004. "Behavioral Economics and Health Economics," NBER Working Papers 10881, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Rustam Ibragimov, 2008. "A tale of two tails: peakedness properties in inheritance models of evolutionary theory," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 18(5), pages 597-613, October.
    9. Joan Costa-Font & Joan Gil, 2008. "Would Socio-Economic Inequalities in Depression Fade Away with Income Transfers?," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 539-558, December.
    10. Tremblay, Carol Horton & Grosskopf, Shawna & Yang, Ke, 2010. "Brainstorm: Occupational choice, bipolar illness and creativity," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 233-241, July.
    11. repec:ese:iserwp:2000-37 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Alexandre Marinho, 2004. "Evidências e Modelos Sobre a Coexistência de Hospitais com Fins Lucrativos e Hospitais sem Fins Lucrativos no Sistema Único de Saúde Brasileiro," Discussion Papers 1041, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
    13. Joan Costa Font & Joan Gil Trasfi, 2006. "Socio-Economic Inequalities in Reported Depression in Spain : A Decomposition Approach," Working Papers in Economics 152, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    14. Edward C. Norton & Courtney Harold Van Houtven & Richard C. Lindrooth & Sharon-Lise T. Normand & Barbara Dickey, 2002. "Does prospective payment reduce inpatient length of stay?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(5), pages 377-387.

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