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Changes in Returns to Task-Specific Skills and Gender Wage Gap

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  • Shintaro Yamaguchi

Abstract

How did skilled-biased technological change affect wage inequality, particularly between men and women? To answer that question this paper constructs a task-based Roy model in which workers possess a bundle of basic skills, and occupations are characterized as a bundle of basic tasks. The model is structurally estimated using the task data from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles and the PSID. The main empirical finding is that men have more motor skills than women, but the returns to motor skills have dropped significantly, accounting for more than 40% of the narrowing gender wage gap.

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File URL: http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/econ/rsrch/papers/archive/2013-01.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by McMaster University in its series Department of Economics Working Papers with number 2013-01.

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Length: 53 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mcm:deptwp:2013-01

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Keywords: Roy model; task-based approach; occupational choice; skill-biased technological change; soft skills.;

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Cited by:
  1. Summerfield, Fraser, 2014. "Labor Market Conditions, Skill Requirements and Education Mismatch," CLSSRN working papers, Vancouver School of Economics clsrn_admin-2014-19, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 28 Apr 2014.
  2. Laura Turner & Aloysius Siow & Gueorgui Kambourov, 2014. "Relationship Skills in the Labor and Marriage Markets," 2014 Meeting Papers, Society for Economic Dynamics 155, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Michael J. Boehm, 2013. "Has job polarization squeezed the middle class? Evidence from the allocation of talents," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 51554, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  4. Michael J. Boehm, 2013. "Has Job Polarization Squeezed the Middle Class? Evidence from the Allocation of Talents," CEP Discussion Papers, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE dp1215, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

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