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Pay What You Want – But Pay Enough! Information Asymmetries and PWYW-Pricing

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  • Matthias Greiff

    ()
    (University of Giessen)

  • Henrik Egbert

    ()
    (University of Applied Science)

  • Kreshnik Xhangolli

    ()
    (University of Applied Science)

Abstract

Pay What You Want (PWYW) pricing has received considerable attention recently. Empirical studies show that if PWYW pricing is implemented, in a number of cases consumers do not behave selfishly and that some producers are able to use PWYW for increasing turnover and profits respectively. In this paper we add information asymmetries to the existing explanations regarding consumer behavior and argue that information asymmetries may account for the results found in empirical studies. Since the success of PWYW pricing depends on the distribution of information, one implication is that optimization strategies with respect to pricing should take information asymmetries into account.

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Paper provided by Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung) in its series MAGKS Papers on Economics with number 201304.

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Length: 15 pages
Date of creation: 2013
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Publication status: Forthcoming in
Handle: RePEc:mar:magkse:201304

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  1. Nick Feltovich, 2011. "The Effect of Subtracting a Constant from all Payoffs in a Hawk-Dove Game: Experimental Evidence of Loss Aversion in Strategic Behavior," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 814-826, April.
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  3. Regner, Tobias & Barria, Javier A., 2009. "Do consumers pay voluntarily? The case of online music," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 395-406, August.
  4. Schmidt, Klaus M. & Spann, Martin & Zeithammer, Robert, 2012. "Pay What You Want as a Marketing Strategy in Monopolistic and Competitive Markets," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 393, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
  5. Simon G�chter & Arno Riedl, 2003. "Moral Property Rights in Bargaining with Infeasible Claims," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-055/1, Tinbergen Institute.
  6. Steve Buchheit & Nick Feltovich, 2011. "Experimental Evidence Of A Sunk‐Cost Paradox: A Study Of Pricing Behavior In Bertrand–Edgeworth Duopoly," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 52(2), pages 317-347, 05.
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  8. Kim Ju-Young & Natter Martin & Spann Martin, 2010. "Kish: Where Customers Pay As They Wish," Review of Marketing Science, De Gruyter, vol. 8(2), pages 1-14, July.
  9. Bolton, Lisa E & Warlop, Luk & Alba, Joseph W, 2003. " Consumer Perceptions of Price (Un)Fairness," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(4), pages 474-91, March.
  10. Tobias Regner, 2010. "Why Consumers Pay Voluntarily: Evidence from Online Music," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-081, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.
  11. Kahneman, Daniel & Knetsch, Jack L & Thaler, Richard, 1986. "Fairness as a Constraint on Profit Seeking: Entitlements in the Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(4), pages 728-41, September.
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