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Doing good with other people's money: A charitable giving experiment with students in environmental sciences and economics

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  • Frederik Carlsson

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Gothenburg)

  • Mitesh Kataria

    ()
    (Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group, Jena)

  • Elina Lampi

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Gothenburg)

  • M. Vittoria Levati

    ()
    (Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group, Jena)

Abstract

We augment a standard dictator game to investigate how preferences for an environmental project relate to willingness to limit others' choices. We explore this issue by distinguishing three student groups: economists, environmental economists, and environmental social scientists. We find that people are generally disposed to grant freedom of choice, but only within certain limits. In addition, our results are in line with the widely held belief that economists are more selfish than other people. Yet, against the notion of consumer sovereignty, economists are not less likely to restrict others' choices and impose restrictions closer to their own preferences than the other student groups.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics in its series Jena Economic Research Papers with number 2010-089.

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Date of creation: 15 Dec 2010
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Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2010-089

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Keywords: dictator game; charitable giving; social preferences; paternalism;

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