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The role of ideology in disagreements among economists: a quantitative analysis

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  • Thomas Mayer
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    Abstract

    How justified is the charge that ideology strongly influences the allegedly objective opinions of economists? An analysis of a new survey of AEA members and of surveys of labour economists and public economists shows that value judgments and judgments about the government's efficacy have some influence on the way economists think about what should be purely economic issues. But such influence is not strong enough to explain much of the disagreement among economists.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13501780110047309
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Economic Methodology.

    Volume (Year): 8 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 253-273

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:jecmet:v:8:y:2001:i:2:p:253-273

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    Keywords: Ideology; Bias In Economics; Objectivity Of Economists; Value Judgments Of Economists; Economics As Science;

    References

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    1. Backhouse, R.E., 1993. "The Fixation of Economic Beliefs," Discussion Papers 93-15, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    2. Thomas Mayer, . "Monetarists And Keynesians On Central Banking: A Study Of A Failed Debate," Department of Economics 96-06, California Davis - Department of Economics.
    3. Modigliani, Franco, 1977. "The Monetarist Controversy or, Should We Forsake Stabilization Policies?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 1-19, March.
    4. Frey, Bruno S & Eichenberger, Reiner, 1992. "Economics and Economists: A European Perspective," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 216-20, May.
    5. David Colander, 1994. "Vision, judgment, and disagreement among economists," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 43-56.
    6. Ricketts, Martin & Shoesmith, Edward, 1992. "British Economic Opinion: Positive Science or Normative Judgment?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 210-15, May.
    7. Donald McCloskey, 1994. "How economists persuade," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 15-32.
    8. Victor R. Fuchs & Alan B. Krueger & James M. Poterba, 1998. "Economists' Views about Parameters, Values, and Policies: Survey Results in Labor and Public Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1387-1425, September.
    9. Mayer, T., 1993. "Why is there so Much Disagreement Among Economists?," Papers 93-20, California Davis - Institute of Governmental Affairs.
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    Cited by:
    1. Kataria, Mitesh, 2012. "The role of preferences in disagreements over scientific hypothesis: Evidence on cognitive bias in formation of beliefs," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 364-369.
    2. Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "Minority Positions in the German Council of Economic Experts: A Political Economic Analysis," CESifo Working Paper Series 4206, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Carlsson, Fredrik & Kataria, Mitesh & Lampi, Elina & Levati, M., Vittoria, 2011. "Doing good with other people’s money: A charitable giving experiment with students in environmental sciences and economics," Working Papers in Economics 487, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    4. Klaus Mohn, 2010. "Autism in Economics? A Second Opinion," Forum for Social Economics, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 191-208, July.

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