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The Political Opinions of Swedish Social Scientists

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Author Info

  • Berggren, Niclas

    ()
    (The Ratio Institute)

  • Jordahl, Henrik

    ()
    (IFN)

  • Stern, Charlotta

    ()
    (SOFI, Stockholm University)

Abstract

We study the political opinions of Swedish social scientists in seven disciplines. A survey was sent to 4,301 academics at 25 colleges and universities, which makes the coverage of the disciplines included more or less comprehensive. When it comes to party sympathies there are 1.3 academics on the right for each academic on the left—a sharp contrast to the situation in the United States, where Democrats greatly dominate the social sciences. The corresponding ratio for Swedish citizens in general is 1.1. The most left-leaning disciplines are sociology and gender studies, the most right-leaning ones are business administration, economics, and law, with political science and economic history somewhere in between. The differences between the disciplines are smaller in Sweden than in the more polarized U.S. We also asked 14 policy questions. The replies largely confirm the pattern of a left-right divide – but overall the desire to change the status quo is tepid.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The Ratio Institute in its series Ratio Working Papers with number 112.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: 21 May 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Finnish Economic Papers, 2009, pages 75-88.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:ratioi:0112

Contact details of provider:
Postal: The Ratio Institute, P.O. Box 5095, SE-102 42 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: 08-441 59 00
Fax: 08-441 59 29
Email:
Web page: http://www.ratio.se/
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Keywords: Academics; social scientists; policy views; political opinions; party sympathies;

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References

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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. But Swedish Social Scientists are Right Wing
    by David Stern in Stochastic Trend on 2010-01-22 22:45:00
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Cited by:
  1. Berggren, Niclas & Jordahl, Henrik & Poutvaara, Panu, 2010. "The Right Look: Conservative Politicians Look Better and Their Voters Reward it," Ratio Working Papers 161, The Ratio Institute.

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