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Wage Mobility in East and West Germany

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Author Info

  • Riphahn, Regina T.

    ()
    (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)

  • Schnitzlein, Daniel D.

    ()
    (DIW Berlin)

Abstract

This article studies the long run patterns and explanations of wage mobility as a characteristic of regional labor markets. Using German administrative data we describe wage mobility since 1975 in West and since 1992 in East Germany. Wage mobility declined substantially in East Germany in the 1990s and moderately in East and West Germany since the late 1990s. Therefore, wage mobility does not balance recent increases in cross-sectional wage inequality. We apply RIF (recentered influence function) regression based decompositions to measure the role of potential explanatory factors behind these mobility changes. Increasing job stability is an important factor associated with the East German mobility decline.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6246.

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Length: 67 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6246

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Related research

Keywords: wage mobility; earnings mobility; income mobility; Germany; East Germany; inequality; transition matrix; Shorrocks index; administrative data;

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References

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  1. Gert G. Wagner & Joachim R. Frick & Jürgen Schupp, 2007. "The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP): Scope, Evolution and Enhancements," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 1, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  2. Richard Burkhauser & Shuaizhang Feng & Stephen Jenkins, 2007. "Using the P90/P10 Index to Measure U.S. Inequality Trends with Current Population Survey Data: A View From Inside the Census Bureau Vaults," Working Papers 07-17, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  3. Bernd Fitzenberger & Aderonke Osikominu & Robert Völter, 2006. "Imputation Rules to Improve the Education Variable in the IAB Employment Subsample," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 126(3), pages 405-436.
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Cited by:
  1. Jäntti, Markus & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2013. "Income Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 7730, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Rothe, Thomas & Giannelli, Gianna C. & Jaenichen, Ursula, 2013. "Doing well in reforming the labour market? Recent trends in job stability and wages in Germany," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79932, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  3. Aretz, Bodo, 2013. "Gender Differences in German Wage Mobility," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80003, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  4. Daniel D. Schnitzlein & Jens Stephani, 2013. "Locus of Control and Low-Wage Mobility," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 589, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  5. Aretz, Bodo, 2013. "Gender differences in German wage mobility," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-003, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  6. David Card & Jörg Heining & Patrick Kline, 2012. "Workplace Heterogeneity and the Rise of West German Wage Inequality," NBER Working Papers 18522, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Aretz, Bodo & Gürtzgen, Nicole, 2012. "What explains the decline in wage mobility in the German low-wage sector?," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-041, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  8. Kai Daniel Schmid & Ulrike Stein, 2013. "Explaining Rising Income Inequality in Germany, 1991-2010," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 592, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  9. Stephani, Jens, 2013. "Does it matter where you work? : employer characteristics and the wage growth of low-wage workers and higher-wage workers," IAB Discussion Paper 201304, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  10. Giannelli, Gianna Claudia & Jaenichen, Ursula & Rothe, Thomas, 2013. "Doing Well in Reforming the Labour Market? Recent Trends in Job Stability and Wages in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 7580, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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