Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Caught in a Trap? Wage Mobility in Great Britain: 1975-1994

Contents:

Author Info

  • Dickens, Richard

Abstract

In this paper I study wage mobility in Great Britain using the New Earnings Surveys of 1975-94 and the British Household Panel Surveys of 1991-94. Measuring mobility in terms of decile transition matrices, I find a considerable degree of immobility within the wage distribution from one year to the next. Mobility is higher when measured over longer time periods. Those in lower deciles in the wage distribution are much more likely to exit into unemployment and non-employment. Measuring mobility by studying changes in individuals' actual percentile rankings in the wage distribution, I find evidence that short-run mobility rates have fallen since the late 1970s. This has potentially important welfare implications, given the rise in cross-section earnings inequality observed over the last two decades. Copyright 2000 by The London School of Economics and Political Science

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showTOC&journalCode=ecca&volume=67&issue=268&year=&part=null
File Function: link to full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by London School of Economics and Political Science in its journal Economica.

Volume (Year): 67 (2000)
Issue (Month): 268 (November)
Pages: 477-97

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:67:y:2000:i:268:p:477-97

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE
Phone: +44 (020) 7405 7686
Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0013-0427
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=0013-0427

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Aretz, Bodo & Gürtzgen, Nicole, 2012. "What Explains the Decline in Wage Mobility in the German Low-Wage Sector?," IZA Discussion Papers 7046, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Richard Dickens & David Ellwood, 2001. "Whither Poverty in Great Britain and the United States? The Determinants of Changing Poverty and Whether Work Will Work," CEP Discussion Papers dp0506, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Aretz, Bodo, 2013. "Gender differences in German wage mobility," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-003, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  4. Ronald Bachmann & Peggy Bechara & Sandra Schaffner, 2012. "Wage Inequality and Wage Mobility in Europe," Ruhr Economic Papers 0386, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  5. SOLOGON Denisa & O?DONOGHUE Cathal, 2012. "Shaping earnings instability: labour market policy and institutional factors," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2012-06, CEPS/INSTEAD.
  6. Aretz, Bodo & Gürtzgen, Nicole, 2012. "The Evolution of Wage Mobility in the German Low-Wage Sector - Is There Evidence for Increasing State Dependence?," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62049, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  7. Danny Ben-Shahar & Eyal Sulganik, 2011. "Vacancy chains and the degree of mobility in the housing market," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 569-583, December.
  8. Aretz, Bodo, 2013. "Gender Differences in German Wage Mobility," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80003, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  9. Augustin de Coulon & Boris A. Z�rcher, 2001. "Low-Pay Mobility in the Swiss Labor Market," Working Papers 447, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
  10. Denisa Maria Sologon & Cathal O'Donoghue, 2009. "Increased Opportunity to Move up the Economic Ladder?: Earnings Mobility in EU: 1994-2001," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 221, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  11. Pavlopoulos, Dimitris & Muffels, Ruud & Vermunt, Jeroen-K., 2005. "Wage Mobility in Europe. A Comparative Analysis Using restricted Multinomial Logit Regression," MPRA Paper 229, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Sologon, Denisa Maria & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2009. "Earnings Dynamics and Inequality among Men across 14 EU Countries, 1994-2001: Evidence from ECHP," IZA Discussion Papers 4012, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Sologon, Denisa Maria & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2010. "Earnings Dynamics and Inequality among Men in Luxembourg, 1988-2004: Evidence from Administrative Data," IZA Discussion Papers 5014, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:67:y:2000:i:268:p:477-97. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.