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The Gender Wage Gap in Four Countries

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Author Info

  • Daly, Anne

    ()
    (University of Canberra)

  • Kawaguchi, Akira

    ()
    (Doshisha University)

  • Meng, Xin

    ()
    (Australian National University)

  • Mumford, Karen A.

    ()
    (University of York)

Abstract

In a series of studies written during the 1980s Bob Gregory and his co-authors compared the gender wage gap in Australia with that found in other countries. They found it was not the difference in human capital endowments that explained different gender wage gaps but rather the rewards for these endowments. They concluded that country-specific factors, especially the institutional environment, were important in explaining the gender wage gap. This study updates Gregory's work by comparing the gender wage gap across four countries, Australia, France, Japan and Britain. Our results concord with those of Gregory: institutions are still important in explaining the relative size of the gender wage gap.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 1921.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1921

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Keywords: workplace effects; institutions; wage gap; gender earnings;

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References

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  1. Karen Mumford & Peter N Smith, . "The Gender Earnings Gap in Britain," Discussion Papers 04/05, Department of Economics, University of York.
  2. Mumford, Karen A. & Smith, Peter N., 2004. "Job Tenure in Britain: Employee Characteristics Versus Workplace Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 1085, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  4. Altonji, Joseph G. & Blank, Rebecca M., 1999. "Race and gender in the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 48, pages 3143-3259 Elsevier.
  5. Mark Wooden, 2001. "Industrial Relations Reform in Australia: Causes, Consequences and Prospects," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(3), pages 243-262.
  6. Gregory, R.G. & Daly, A.E., 1990. "Can Economic Theory Explain Why Australian Women Are So Well Paid Relative To Their U.S. Counterparts?," CEPR Discussion Papers 226, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  7. Xin Meng & Dominique Meurs, 2004. "The gender earnings gap: effects of institutions and firms--a comparative study of French and Australian private firms," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(2), pages 189-208, April.
  8. R. G. Gregory & R. C. Duncan, 1981. "Segmented Labor Market Theories and the Australian Experience of Equal Pay for Women," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 3(3), pages 403-428, April.
  9. Bob Gregory, 1999. "Labour Market Institutions and the Gender Pay Ratio," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(3), pages 273-278.
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Cited by:
  1. Linz, Susan J. & Semykina, Anastasia, 2008. "How do workers fare during transition? Perceptions of job insecurity among Russian workers, 1995-2004," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 442-458, June.
  2. Marie Drolet & Karen Mumford, 2012. "The Gender Pay Gap for Private-Sector Employees in Canada and Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 50(3), pages 529-553, 09.
  3. Tindara Addabbo & Donata Favaro, 2009. "Education and wage differentials by gender in Italy," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 036, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics.
  4. Dorota Witkowska, 2013. "Gender Disparities in the Labor Market in the EU," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer, vol. 19(4), pages 331-354, November.

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