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Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Education and Health Interventions in Developing Countries

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  • Patrick J. McEwan

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Abstract

High-quality impact evaluations, including randomized experiments, are increasingly popular, but cannot always inform resource allocation decisions unless the costs of interventions are considered alongside their effects. Cost-effectiveness analysis is a straightforward but under-utilized tool for determining which, of two or more interventions provides a (non-pecuniary) unit of effect at least cost. This paper reviews the framework and methods of cost-effectiveness analysis,emphasizing education and health interventions, and discusses how the methods are applied in the literature.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Strategic Planning and Development Effectiveness (SPD) in its series SPD Working Papers with number 1102.

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Date of creation: Dec 2011
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Handle: RePEc:idb:spdwps:1102

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Keywords: Cost-Effectiveness; Cost-Benefit; Impact Evaluation;

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