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The heterogeneous impact of conditional cash transfers

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  • Galiani, Sebastian
  • McEwan, Patrick J.

Abstract

The Honduran PRAF experiment randomly assigned conditional cash transfers to 40 of 70 poor municipalities, within five strata defined by a poverty proxy. Using census data, we show that eligible children were 8 percentage points more likely to enroll in school and 3 percentage points less likely to work. The effects were much larger in the two poorest strata, and statistically insignificant in the other three (the latter finding is robust to the use of a separate regression-discontinuity design). Heterogeneity confirms the importance of judicious targeting to maximize the impact and cost-effectiveness of CCTs. There is no consistent evidence of effects on ineligible children or on adult labor supply.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Public Economics.

Volume (Year): 103 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 85-96

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Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:103:y:2013:i:c:p:85-96

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505578

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Keywords: Honduras; Conditional cash transfers; Education; Child labor; Randomized experiment;

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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. The Heterogeneous Impact of Conditional Cash Transfers
    by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2013-10-15 13:22:59
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Cited by:
  1. Hansen, Henrik & Trifković, Neda, 2014. "Food Standards are Good – For Middle-Class Farmers," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 226-242.
  2. Melba V. Tutor, 2014. "The Impact of Philippines’ Conditional Cash Transfer Program on Consumption," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201405, University of the Philippines School of Economics.

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