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Using Census and Survey Data to Estimate Poverty and Inequality for Small Areas

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Author Info

  • Alessandro Tarozzi

    (Duke University)

  • Angus Deaton

    (Princeton University)

Abstract

Recent years have seen widespread use of small-area maps based on census data enriched by relationships estimated from household surveys that predict variables, such as income, not covered by the census. The purpose is to obtain putatively precise estimates of poverty and inequality for small areas for which no or few observations are available in the survey. We argue that to usefully match survey and census data in this way requires a degree of spatial homogeneity for which the method provides no basis and which is unlikely to be satisfied in practice. We document the potential empirical relevance of such concerns using data from the 2000 census of Mexico. Copyright by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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File URL: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/rest.91.4.773
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal The Review of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 91 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 773-792

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:91:y:2009:i:4:p:773-792

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Cited by:
  1. Echevin, Damien, 2011. "Vulnerability and livelihoods before and after the Haiti earthquake," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5850, The World Bank.
  2. Christiaensen, Luc & Lanjouw, Peter & Luoto, Jill & Stifel, David, 2011. "Small area estimation-based prediction methods to track poverty : validation and applications," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5683, The World Bank.
  3. Bryan S. Graham & Cristine Campos de Xavier Pinto & Daniel Egel, 2011. "Efficient Estimation of Data Combination Models by the Method of Auxiliary-to-Study Tilting (AST)," NBER Working Papers 16928, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Nguyen, Cuong & Tran Ngoc, Truong & Van der Weide, Roy, 2009. "Rural Poverty and Inequality Maps in Vietnam: Estimation using Vietnam Household Living Standard Survey 2006 and Rural Agriculture and Fishery Census 2006," MPRA Paper 36378, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Sebastian Galiani & Patrick J. McEwan, 2013. "The Heterogeneous Impact of Conditional Cash Transfers," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0149, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  6. Bryan S. Graham & Cristine Campos De Xavier Pinto & Daniel Egel, 2012. "Inverse Probability Tilting for Moment Condition Models with Missing Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(3), pages 1053-1079.
  7. Arndt, Channing & Hussain, M. Azhar & Salvucci, Vincenzo & Tarp, Finn & Osterdal, Lars, 2013. "Advancing small area estimation," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  8. Ana Flávia Machado & Rafael Perez Ribas, 2008. "Do Changes in the Labour Market Take Families out of Poverty? Determinants of Exiting Poverty in Brazilian Metropolitan Regions," Working Papers 44, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  9. Steven Stern, 2011. "Estimating Local Prevalence of Mental Health Problems," Virginia Economics Online Papers 396, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
  10. Jing Dai & Stefan Sperlich & Walter Zucchini, 2011. "Estimating and Predicting Household Expenditures and Income Distributions," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201147, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
  11. Permanyer, Iñaki, 2013. "Using Census Data to Explore the Spatial Distribution of Human Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 1-13.
  12. Jesse Naidoo, 2009. "Finite-Sample Bias and Inconsistency in the Estimation of Poverty Maps," SALDRU Working Papers 36, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  13. Nguyen Viet, Cuong, 2011. "Poverty projection using a small area estimation method: Evidence from Vietnam," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 368-382, September.
  14. Isabel Molina & J.N.K. Rao, 2009. "Small area estimation on poverty indicators," Statistics and Econometrics Working Papers ws091505, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Estadística y Econometría.
  15. Tarozzi, Alessandro, 2011. "Can census data alone signal heterogeneity in the estimation of poverty maps?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 170-185, July.
  16. Francesca Ballini & Gianni Betti & Samuel Carrette & Laura Neri, 2009. "Poverty and inequality mapping in the Commonwealth of Dominica," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 0(Special i), pages 123-162.

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