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Do Conditional Cash Transfers for Schooling Generate Lasting Benefits?: A Five-Year Followup of PROGRESA/Oportunidades

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Author Info

  • Jere R. Behrman
  • Susan W. Parker
  • Petra E. Todd

Abstract

Conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs link public transfers to human capital investment in hopes of alleviating current poverty and reducing its intergenerational transmission. However, little is known about their long-term impacts. This paper evaluates longer-run impacts on schooling and work of the best-known CCT program, Mexico’s PROGRESA/Oportunidades, using experimental and nonexperimental estimators based on groups with different program exposure. The results show positive impacts on schooling, reductions in work for younger youth (consistent with postponing labor force entry), increases in work for older girls, and shifts from agricultural to nonagricultural employment. The evidence suggests schooling effects are robust with time.

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File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/46/1/93
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 46 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 93-122

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:46:y:2011:i:1:p:93-122

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Sebastian Galiani & Patrick J. McEwan, 2013. "The Heterogeneous Impact of Conditional Cash Transfers," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0149, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  2. Todd, Petra E., 2012. "Effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving women's employability and quality of work : a critical review," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6189, The World Bank.
  3. D. Van De Gaer & J. Vandenbossche & J. L. Figueroa, 2011. "Children’s health opportunities and project evaluation: Mexico’s Oportunidades program," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 11/749, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  4. Santiago Levy & Norbert Schady, 2013. "Latin America's Social Policy Challenge: Education, Social Insurance, Redistribution," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(2), pages 193-218, Spring.
  5. Barrera-Osorio, Felipe & Filmer, Deon, 2013. "Incentivizing schooling for learning : evidence on the impact of alternative targeting approaches," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6541, The World Bank.
  6. Pettersson, Jan & Wikström, Johan, 2013. "Peeing out of poverty? Human fertilizer and the productivity of farming households," Working Paper Series 2013:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  7. Laura Camfield, 2014. "Growing Up in Ethiopia and Andhra Pradesh: The Impact of Social Protection Schemes on Girls’ Roles and Responsibilities," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 26(1), pages 107-123, January.
  8. Carlos Chiapa & Laura Juarez, 2012. "The schooling repayment hypothesis for private transfers: Evidence from the PROGRESA/Oportunidades experiment," Working Papers 1201, Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM.
  9. de Hoop, Jacobus & Rosati, Furio C., 2013. "Cash Transfers and Child Labour," IZA Discussion Papers 7496, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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