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Cash transfers and child schooling : evidence from a randomized evaluation of the role of conditionality

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  • Akresh, Richard
  • de Walque, Damien
  • Kazianga, Harounan

Abstract

The authors conduct a randomized experiment in rural Burkina Faso to estimate the impact of alternative cash transfer delivery mechanisms on education. The two-year pilot program randomly distributed cash transfers that were either conditional or unconditional. Families under the conditional schemes were required to have their children ages 7-15 enrolled in school and attending classes regularly. There were no such requirements under the unconditional programs. The results indicate that unconditional and conditional cash transfer programs have a similar impact increasing the enrollment of children who are traditionally favored by parents for school participation, including boys, older children, and higher ability children. However, the conditional transfers are significantly more effective than the unconditional transfers in improving the enrollment of"marginal children"who are initially less likely to go to school, such as girls, younger children, and lower ability children. Thus, conditionality plays a critical role in benefiting children who are less likely to receive investments from their parents.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 6340.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2013
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6340

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Keywords: Youth and Governance; Primary Education; Street Children; Educational Sciences; Education For All;

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References

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  1. Richard Akresh & Damien de Walque & Harounan Kazianga, 2014. "Alternative Cash Transfer Delivery Mechanisms: Impacts on Routine Preventative Health Clinic Visits in Burkina Faso," NBER Chapters, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, in: African Successes: Human Capital National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Karen Macours & Norbert Schady & Renos Vakis, 2011. "Cash Transfers, Behavioral Changes, and Cognitive Development in Early Childhood: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," Working Papers, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group 2011-007, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  3. Sarah Baird & Craig McIntosh & Berk �zler, 2011. "Cash or Condition? Evidence from a Cash Transfer Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(4), pages 1709-1753.
  4. Richard Akresh & Eric V. Edmonds, 2011. "Residential Rivalry and Constraints on the Availability of Child Labor," NBER Working Papers 17165, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  7. Ariel Fiszbein & Norbert Schady & Francisco H. G. Ferreira & Margaret Grosh & Niall Keleher & Pedro Olinto & Emmanuel Skoufias, 2009. "Conditional Cash Transfers : Reducing Present and Future Poverty," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2597, August.
  8. Filmer, Deon & Schady, Norbert, 2011. "Does more cash in conditional cash transfer programs always lead to larger impacts on school attendance?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 150-157, September.
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  11. Felipe Barrera-Osorio & Marianne Bertrand & Leigh L. Linden & Francisco Perez-Calle, 2011. "Improving the Design of Conditional Transfer Programs: Evidence from a Randomized Education Experiment in Colombia," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 167-95, April.
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  16. Stampini, Marco & Tornarolli, Leopoldo, 2012. "The Growth of Conditional Cash Transfers in Latin America and the Caribbean: Did They Go Too Far?," IZA Policy Papers, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) 49, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  19. Richard Akresh & Emilie Bagby & Damien de Walque & Harounan Kazianga, 2012. "Child Labor, Schooling, and Child Ability," Mathematica Policy Research Reports, Mathematica Policy Research 7699, Mathematica Policy Research.
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Adequacy of Reporting in Economics
    by ? in Development Impact on 2013-06-17 14:09:00
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Cited by:
  1. Alderman, Harold & Yemtsov, Ruslan, 2013. "How can safety nets contribute to economic growth ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 6437, The World Bank.
  2. de Hoop, Jacobus & Rosati, Furio C., 2013. "Cash Transfers and Child Labour," IZA Discussion Papers 7496, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Márton Medgyesi & Temesváry, Z., 2013. "GINI DP 84: Conditional cash transfers in high- income OECD countries and their effects on human capital accumulation," GINI Discussion Papers, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies 84, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  4. Morten Skovdal & Laura Robertson & Phyllis Mushati & Lovemore Dumba & Lorraine Sherr & Constance Nyamukapa & Simon Gregson, 2013. "Acceptability of conditions in a community-led cash transfer programme for orphaned and vulnerable children in Zimbabwe," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 52945, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  5. Najy Benhassine & Florencia Devoto & Esther Duflo & Pascaline Dupas & Victor Pouliquen, 2013. "Turning a Shove into a Nudge? A “Labeled Cash Transfer” for Education," NBER Working Papers 19227, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Mideros Mora, Andres & Gassmann, Franziska & Mohnen, Pierre, 2013. "Estimation of rates of return on social protection: Making the case for non-contributory social transfers in Cambodia," MERIT Working Papers, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT) 063, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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