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Educational and Child Labour Impacts of Two Food-for-Education Schemes: Evidence from a Randomised Trial in Rural Burkina Faso-super- †

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  • Harounan Kazianga
  • Damien de Walque
  • Harold Alderman

Abstract

This paper uses a prospective randomised trial to assess the impact of two food-for-education schemes on education and child labour outcomes for children from low-income households in northern rural Burkina Faso. The two food-for-education programmes under consideration are, on the one hand, school meals where students are provided with lunch each school day, and, on the other hand, take-home rations which provide girls with 10 kg of cereal flour each month, conditional on 90% attendance rate. After the programme ran for one academic year, both programmes increased enrolment by 3–5 percentage points. The scores on mathematics improved for girls in both school meals and take-home rations villages. Conditional on enrolment, the interventions caused attendance to decrease, but this was mainly driven by lower attendance among new enrolees. The interventions also led to adjustment in child labour, with children (especially girls) with access to food-for-education programmes, in particular the take-home rations, shifting away from on farm labour and off-farm productive tasks which possibly are more incompatible with school hours. Copyright 2012 , Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE) in its journal Journal of African Economies.

Volume (Year): 21 (2012)
Issue (Month): 5 (November)
Pages: -760

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Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:21:y:2012:i:5:p:-760

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Cited by:
  1. Akresh, Richard & de Walque, Damien & Kazianga, Harounan, 2013. "Cash transfers and child schooling : evidence from a randomized evaluation of the role of conditionality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6340, The World Bank.
  2. Karthik Muralidharan & Nishith Prakash, 2013. "Cycling to School: Increasing Secondary School Enrollment for Girls in India," NBER Working Papers 19305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Barrera-Osorio, Felipe & Filmer, Deon, 2013. "Incentivizing schooling for learning : evidence on the impact of alternative targeting approaches," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6541, The World Bank.
  4. Kazianga, Harounan & de Walque, Damien & Alderman, Harold, 2014. "School feeding programs, intrahousehold allocation and the nutrition of siblings: Evidence from a randomized trial in rural Burkina Faso," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 15-34.

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