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China's Accession to the WTO: What Is at Stake for Agricultural Markets?

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Abstract

The authors analyze the impact of China's accession to the World Trade Organization on major crop and livestock markets using the FAPRI modeling framework. They incorporate expected changes in consumer income, textile production, and trade policies as exogenous shocks to the baseline model. Following accession, revenues decline in China's livestock, grain, and oilseed industries, while cotton production prospers despite increased cotton imports. Chinese consumers benefit from lower food prices, with vegetable oil, dairy, and meat consumption increasing significantly. Argentina, Brazil, Canada, the European Union, and the United States are the greatest beneficiaries from expanded agricultural trade with China.

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File URL: http://www.card.iastate.edu/publications/DBS/PDFFiles/01wp276.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University in its series Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications with number 01-wp276.

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Date of creation: Jun 2001
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Handle: RePEc:ias:fpaper:01-wp276

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References

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  1. Dermot J. Hayes & Roxanne Clemens, 1997. "Chinese Market for U.S. Pork Exports, The," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 97-bp14, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  2. Fang, Cheng & Beghin, John C., 2003. "Protection and Comparative Advantage of Chinese Agriculture: Implications for Regional and National Specialization," Staff General Research Papers 10102, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. repec:jaa:jagape:v:30:y:1998:i:1:p:127-40 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Ianchovichina, Elena, 2001. "Trade Liberalization in China’s Accession to WTO," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 16, pages 421-445.
  5. Wang, Qingbin & Fuller, Frank H. & Hayes, Dermot J. & Halbrendt, Catherine, 1998. "Chinese Consumer Demand for Animal Products and Implications for U.S. Pork and Poultry Exports," Staff General Research Papers 1163, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  6. Fan, Shenggan & Pardey, Philip G., 1997. "Research, productivity, and output growth in Chinese agriculture," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 115-137, June.
  7. Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 1996. "Technological change: Rediscovering the engine of productivity growth in China's rural economy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 337-369, May.
  8. Babcock, Bruce A. & Beghin, John C. & Fuller, Frank H. & Mohanty, Samarendu & Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Kaus, Phillip J. & Fang, Cheng & Hart, Chad E. & Matthey, Holger & de Cara, Stephane & Kovarik, Kare, 2001. "FAPRI 2001 U.S. and World Agricultural Outlook," Staff Reports 32052, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI).
  9. Huang, Jikun & Chen, Chunlai, 1999. "Effects of Trade Liberalization on Agriculture in China: Commodity Aspects," Working Papers 32665, United Nations Centre for Alleviation of Poverty Through Secondary Crops' Development in Asia and the Pacific (CAPSA).
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Cited by:
  1. Fang, Cheng & Beghin, John C., 2002. "Urban Demand for Edible Oils and Fats in China: Evidence from Household Survey Data," Staff General Research Papers 1863, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Anonymous, 2005. "Articles from Volume 1, Issue 1, 2005, Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development," Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, vol. 1(1).
  3. Christophe Charlier, 2012. "Distrust and Barriers to International Trade in Food Products: An Analysis of the US — Poultry Dispute," GREDEG Working Papers 2012-02, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, revised Nov 2013.
  4. Nin, Alejandro & Hertel, Thomas W. & Foster, Kenneth & Rae, Allan, 2004. "Productivity growth, catching-up and uncertainty in China's meat trade," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 1-16, July.
  5. Alan Matthews, 2001. "The Possible Impact of China’s WTO Membership on the WTO Agricultural Negotiations," CEG Working Papers 200110, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

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