Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Chinese Consumer Demand For Animal Products And Implications For U.S. Pork And Poultry Exports

Contents:

Author Info

  • Wang, Qingbin
  • Fuller, Frank H.
  • Hayes, Dermot J.
  • Halbrendt, Catherine K.

Abstract

This paper examines Chinese consumer preference for major animal products and assesses the potential impacts of a reduction in China's import tariff on its pork and poultry demand and net import. Our analysis suggests that China's demand for animal products will continue to grow as income increases. Using a trade model, results of our scenario analysis indicate that a reduction in China's import tariffs will significantly increase its net pork and poultry imports and the U.S. will capture most of the increases. Nevertheless, the impact on the market price in China and the U.S. is likely to be very small.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/15102
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (1998)
Issue (Month): 01 (July)
Pages:

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:15102

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.saea.org/jaae/jaae.htm
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Almost Ideal Demand System; China; Consumer demand; Demand elasticity; Food demand; Partial equilibrium model; Two-stage budgeting; U.S. meat export; Demand and Price Analysis; International Relations/Trade;

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Fan, Shenggen & Cramer, Gail & Wailes, Eric, 1994. "Food demand in rural China: evidence from rural household survey," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 61-69, September.
  2. Huang, Jikun. & Bouis, Howarth E., 1996. "Structural changes in the demand for food in Asia.:," 2020 vision discussion papers 11, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Huang, Jikun & David, Cristina C., 1993. "Demand for cereal grains in Asia: The effect of urbanization," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 8(2), pages 107-124, February.
  4. X.M. Gao & Eric J. Wailes & Gail L. Cramer, 1996. "A Two-Stage Rural Household Demand Analysis: Microdata Evidence from Jiangsu Province, China," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 604-613.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Veeman, Michele M. & Veeman, Terrence S. & Adilu, Shiferaw, 2002. "Analysis Of East Asian Meat Import Demand: Market Prospects For Alberta And Canada," Project Report Series 24063, University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.
  2. Rae, Allan N., 2001. "Trade In Livestock Products And The Wto Millenium Round: Projections To 2005 And Problems With Trq'S," International Trade in Livestock Products Symposium, January 18-19, 2001, Auckland, New Zealand 14564, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
  3. Qin, Xiang Dong & Peng, Xuehua & Marchant, Mary A., 2002. "New Insight Of Chinese Livestock Consumer," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19806, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  4. Nin Pratt, Alejandro & Hertel, Thomas W. & Foster, Kenneth A. & Rae, Allan N., 2001. "Productivity Growth And Catching-Up: Implications For China'S Trade In Livestock Products," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20590, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  5. Dong, Fengxia & Fuller, Frank H., 2004. "Testing For Separability And Structural Change In Urban Chinese Food Demand," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19923, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  6. Ortega, David L. & Wang, H. Holly & Wu, Laping, 2009. "Assessing Consumer Preferences and Attitudes toward Imported Pork in Urban China," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 49993, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  7. Frank H. Fuller & John C. Beghin & Stephane De Cara & Jacinto F. Fabiosa & Cheng Fang & Holger Matthey, 2001. "China's Accession to the WTO: What Is at Stake for Agricultural Markets?," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 01-wp276, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
  8. Qingbin Wang & Robert Parsons & Guangxuan Zhang, 2010. "China's dairy markets: trends, disparities, and implications for trade," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(3), pages 356-371, September.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:15102. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.