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Innovation, Technological Change And The British Agricultural Revolution

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  • James B. Ang

    ()

  • Rajabrata Banerjee
  • Jakob B. Madsen

Abstract

Theory, historiography and empirical evidence suggest that agriculture is the key to economic development. This paper examines the extent to which productivity advances in British agriculture in the period 1620-1850 were driven by technological progress. Measuring technology by patents and new book titles on agricultural methods, the results indicate that technological progress has played a significant part in productivity advances. Furthermore, the results show that research effort has permanent growth effects, consistent with the prediction of Schumpeterian growth theory.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University in its series CAMA Working Papers with number 2010-11.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:een:camaaa:2010-11

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Rajabrata Banerjee, 2012. "Population Growth and Endogenous Technological Change: Australian Economic Growth in the Long Run," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(281), pages 214-228, 06.
  2. Banerjee, Rajabrata, 2011. "The US-UK productivity gap in the twentieth century: a race between technology and population," MPRA Paper 30889, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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