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Public sector corruption and the probability of technological disasters

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  • Eiji Yamamura

Abstract

A growing number of studies have explored the influence of institution on the outcomes of disasters and accidents from the viewpoint of political economy. This paper focuses on the probability of the occurrence of disasters rather than disaster outcomes. Using panel data from 98 countries, this paper examines how public sector corruption is associated with the probability of technological disasters. It was found that public sector corruption raises the probability of technological disasters. This result is robust when endogeneity bias is controlled.

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Paper provided by Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels in its series EERI Research Paper Series with number EERI RP 2013/02.

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Date of creation: 02 Jan 2013
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Handle: RePEc:eei:rpaper:eeri_rp_2013_02

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Keywords: Corruption; Institution; Disasters; Risk;

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Cited by:
  1. Eiji Yamamura, 2013. "Impact of natural disaster on public sector corruption," Development Research Working Paper Series, Institute for Advanced Development Studies 06/2013, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.

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