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Effects of interactions among social capital, income, and learning from experiences of natural disasters: A case study from Japan

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  • yamamura, eiji

Abstract

This paper explores how and the extent to which social capital has an effect on the damage resulting from natural disasters. It also examines whether the experience of a natural disaster affects individual and collective protection against future disasters. There are three major findings. (1) Social capital reduces the damage caused by natural disasters. (2) The risk of a natural disaster makes people more apt to cooperate and therefore social capital is more effective to prevent disasters. (3) Income is an important factor for reducing damage, but hardly influences it when the scale of a disaster is small.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 16223.

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Date of creation: 13 Jul 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:16223

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Keywords: Social Capital; Learning; Natural disaster;

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References

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  1. Thomas A. Garrett & Russell S. Sobel, 2002. "The political economy of FEMA disaster payments," Working Papers 2002-012, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  2. Alesina, Alberto & La Ferrara, Eliana, 2002. "Who trusts others?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 207-234, August.
  3. Kean Birch & Geoff Whittam, 2008. "The Third Sector and the Regional Development of Social Capital," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(3), pages 437-450.
  4. Roger Congleton, 2006. "The story of Katrina: New Orleans and the political economy of catastrophe," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 127(1), pages 5-30, April.
  5. Catherine Eckel & Philip J. Grossman & Angela Milano, 2007. "Is More Information Always Better? An Experimental Study of Charitable Giving and Hurrican Katrina," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 388-411, October.
  6. Berggren, Niclas & Jordahl, Henrik, 2005. "Free to Trust? Economic Freedom and Social Capital," Working Paper Series 2005:2, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  7. Alberto Alesina & Eliana La Ferrara, . "Participation in Heterogeneous Communities," Working Papers 151, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  8. Monica Escaleras & Nejat Anbarci & Charles Register, 2007. "Public sector corruption and major earthquakes: A potentially deadly interaction," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 209-230, July.
  9. William F. Chappell & Richard G. Forgette & David A. Swanson & Mark V. Van Boening, 2007. "Determinants of Government Aid to Katrina Survivors: Evidence from Survey Data," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 344-362, October.
  10. La Ferrara, Eliana & Alesina, Alberto, 2000. "Participation in Heterogeneous Communities," Scholarly Articles 4551796, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "Social capital, household income, and preferences for income redistribution," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 498-511.
  2. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Effect of transparency on changing views regarding nuclear energy before and after Japan’s 2011 natural disasters: A cross-country analysis," MPRA Paper 30954, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Yamamura, Eiji, 2013. "Transparency and View Regarding Nuclear Energy Before and After the Fukushima Accident: Evidence on Micro-data," MPRA Paper 46608, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Yamamura, Eiji, 2013. "Natural disasters and social capital formation: The impact of the Great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake," MPRA Paper 44493, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Effect of transparency on changing views regarding nuclear energy before and after Fukushima accident," MPRA Paper 34346, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Eiji Yamamura & Yoshiro Tsutsui & Chisako Yamane & Shoko Yamane, 2014. "Effect of major disasters on geographical mobility intentions: the case of the Fukushima nuclear accident," ISER Discussion Paper 0903, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  7. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Effect of social capital on income distribution preferences: comparison of neighborhood externality between high- and low-income households," MPRA Paper 32557, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Eiji Yamamura & Yoshiro Tsutsui & Chisako Yamane & Shoko Yamane & Nattavudh Powdthavee, 2014. "Trust and Happiness: Comparative Study Before and After the Great East Japan Earthquake," ISER Discussion Paper 0904, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  9. Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "Effect of the Fukushima accident on saving electricity: The case of the Japanese Professional Baseball League," MPRA Paper 42674, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Institution, economic development, and impact of natural disasters," MPRA Paper 32069, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "Natural disasters and participation in volunteer activities: A case study of the Great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake," MPRA Paper 37734, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Effect of free media on views regarding the safety of nuclear energy after the 2011 disasters in Japan: evidence using cross-country data," MPRA Paper 32011, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "Death tolls from natural disasters: Influence of interactions between fiscal decentralization, institution, and economic development," MPRA Paper 36987, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  14. Brata, Aloysius Gunadi, 2010. "Regional Development for a Disastrous Country," MPRA Paper 23606, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Eiji Yamamura, 2013. "Institution and decomposition of natural disaster impact on growth," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 40(6), pages 720 - 738, November.
  16. Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "Natural disasters and their long-term effect on happiness: the case of the great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake," MPRA Paper 37505, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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